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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-05-2010, 07:22 PM Thread Starter
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Home Addition -- Construction Question

I have a brick home and want to add an addition. Many years ago, this area used to be a sun room. An explosion (don't store propane in an enclosed space) caused extensive damage and the sun room was not rebuilt. The HVAC duct-work is capped off in the attic still.

Corner I want to tie into:



Area for the addition is already covered.


If I want to tie into the home's existing framework, I 'guess' I need to remove the brick from that corner, right? Do I rent a saw and cut through it...then, tie my 2x4 into the existing framework from there? Or, can I use some anchor bolts of some type and simply tie into the existing brick and seal the joint with caulk?

Suggestions and input is greatly appreciated! I have googled many different terms and can't find a good answer to this. This will be a 100% DIY project (if that matters).

Have a good day!
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-05-2010, 08:12 PM
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A 4x4 anchored to the brick would certainly work.However..... I would check with your local building inspector.Codes vary from state to state and even town to town.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-05-2010, 08:36 PM
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is the brick laid up against tar paper and metal screen over sheathing? it aint gonna support nothing. has to go.... bobn not trying to impress anybody but self employed in residential construction for 17 years....

Last edited by zephyrbob; 12-05-2010 at 08:40 PM.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-05-2010, 10:10 PM
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X2 check with a code inspector before you do anything you don't want to have to tear it all out if you piss them off.

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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-05-2010, 10:24 PM
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Michael
My first conceren is what type of footing you have below the covered porch. Is it continuous or just a pier footing @ the colums. Your local code may let you span the distance with a grade beam. Here in ND they require a 4' deep footing, so as others have mentioned I would consult your local Building Inspector & get your code requirements. I'm an architectural draftsman for 23 years & have found it is not always asking for for forgiveness instead of permission.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-06-2010, 01:05 AM
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Michael
My first conceren is what type of footing you have below the covered porch. Is it continuous or just a pier footing @ the colums. Your local code may let you span the distance with a grade beam. Here in ND they require a 4' deep footing, so as others have mentioned I would consult your local Building Inspector & get your code requirements. I'm an architectural draftsman for 23 years & have found it is not always asking for for forgiveness instead of permission.
Ken
x3 theese guys know what their talkin about do the right thing!!!but yes what you're tryin to do will work with the proper method!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-06-2010, 11:14 PM
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I know on my parents house the original builder/owner decided after it was finished to later enclose the huge open covered patio & convert it into a very large family/game room.

Only problem was since the original patio foundation/floor was never originally meant to have a brick wall standing around it's perimeter, there was no brick-step built into it for the brick wall to sit on. Without a brick-step built into the foundation's perimeter to help keep rain/water in check, they have had instances where some water got under the brick wall & inside the house through the brick weep holes during really strong rain storms.

If the original builder hadn't been such a dumb azz, he would have included some kind of flashing/barrier/seal/etc down at the wall/floor joint to help keep water out before laying the brick wall on the flat foundation/floor.

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-08-2010, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by D.I.L.L.I.G.A.S. View Post
I know on my parents house the original builder/owner decided after it was finished to later enclose the huge open covered patio & convert it into a very large family/game room.

Only problem was since the original patio foundation/floor was never originally meant to have a brick wall standing around it's perimeter, there was no brick-step built into it for the brick wall to sit on. Without a brick-step built into the foundation's perimeter to help keep rain/water in check, they have had instances where some water got under the brick wall & inside the house through the brick weep holes during really strong rain storms.

If the original builder hadn't been such a dumb azz, he would have included some kind of flashing/barrier/seal/etc down at the wall/floor joint to help keep water out before laying the brick wall on the flat foundation/floor.
Yeah if you look at that pad it looks to be durrable enough , look's to be 4 to 6" thick so that's not an issue.

"that which the mind of man can concieve and belive ,he can achieve!......
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-23-2010, 11:47 AM
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Framing

The new framed wall will be anchored at the bottom plate and the top plate. I would butt the framing to the brick with no attachment or anchors to the brick. The new framed wall on a foundation or not, may move differently than your exsisting walls. This could pull any anchor points and the brick may fracture or mortor joints to crack. If there is a exsisting continious foundation the movement may not be as much of a problem. The freeze/ thaw cycle moves buildings more than we realize. 1/8th or 1/4'' of movement can cause a head ache for sure. What do you have for a foundation in this corner? This is just my opinion. Good luck.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-24-2010, 11:57 AM
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I feel that if you leave the existing beam that supports the roof in place along with the existing post just filling in between them would be fine with your new framing. The new walls would not be load bearing so there would be little concern for the existing slab to be modified in any way. butting it to the brick wall will be fine as mentioned by another don't fasten it too well to allow for movement. I have enclosed many porches like this and have never had any problems as long as the existing supports are left intact. Is this going to be permanent living space or a sun room? If you have any other questions let me know as I would be glad to help. Oh by the way I have over 30 years exp. in home building of all types.
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