460 Ford Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
as a new bbf convert, used to be a mopar guy, i just read an ad where a block for sale was listed as having boss 429 bulkheads. exactly what are they, how can i identify, and why do i want them? thanx from a bbf newbie!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,547 Posts
Generally speaking, all passenger car 429/460 block castings are the same configuration. What I mean by this is that there was not a 429-specific or 460-specific passenger car block casting; they are one and the same castings on any given year of production. D0VE-A blocks, however, have thicker main webs than non-D0VE blocks and which facilitate the 4-bolt main cap conversion. (These days there are 4-bolt main cap conversion kits for thick webbed D0VE blocks and also the standard webbed blocks, but many still prefer the D0VE blocks.) Typically, the 4-bolt conversion on the passenger car blocks is executed on main webs 2, 3, & 4.

Boss 429 engines have 4-bolt main caps not only on 2, 3, & 4, but also on main cap #1 (4-bolted on 1, 2, 3, & 4 mains).

Stating that a D0VE-A block has "Boss bulkheads" means that when that block pattern was assembled and packed with sand for the pour at the foundry, the front and rear sections of that particular block casting pattern was constructed using the front and rear casting patterns which were standard for the Boss 429 engine and which allows for more iron to be cast into the front of the bock casting (for the 4-bolting of the Boss block's #1 main). There are several features of the Boss 429 bulkheads which are easily identifiable when they are during a D0VE-A block casting, but the features that interest the performance enthusiasts most is that there is more material in several different areas around the #1 main web of the passenger car D0VE block. This additional amount of material allows for greater overall structural integrity of the engine block's frontal area, is better suited for 4-bolting of the #1 main cap (technically speaking) because of additional material where the outer bolt holes would be drilled and tapped, has more material around the perimeter of the # 1 main bearing saddle which is well suited for blower builds which usually have the crankshaft snout being tugged upward toward the engine block's #1 main saddle, etc. So in general terms, whereas a D0VE block is deemed a stronger block in the main web area than the standard webbed blocks, the D0VE blocks with the Boss bulkheads takes that up a notch.

Usually but not always, these blocks have a raised "A" on a square pad cast at the front of the block. This feature indicates to a prosepcting enthusiast that this block has the Boss 429 bulkhead.

Please note that while all "A" marked blocks (to date) have Boss 429 bulkheads, there are Boss 429 bulkhead passenger car blocks that don't have the "A" at the front of the block. I have them both ways. What this means is that if you are scouring a junk yard and find a D0VE-A block with the "A" on the raised square pad, you've just found yourself a D0VE-A block with a Boss 429 bulkhead. If the "A" is not there, then it may or may not have the Boss bulkhead. The "A" is basically a garantee that it's there (until someone finds otherwise).

Paul

p.s.: D0VE blocks with Boss bulkheads cannot be drilled to have the primary mains oil system features of the Boss 429 block because the core section of the passenger car block casting pattern is not like that of a Boss 429 pattern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
Hey, Paul:
That was about the best in depth explanation I've read about identifying "boss bulkhead" D0VE blocks. Like all things "Ford", the only certain thing is --- nothings certain (LOL)!

Wayne (SAWDOFF) Pearce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
All I will say is I would not pay any more for an "A" block. On the two I looked at the main webbing was same as a none "A" D0VE-A and one of "A"s had a few thin cylinders. Unless I was 4 bolting the #1 main would not care about the boss bulkheads either and even then would not pay more for them.

To me the value in a D0VE-A block is the thicker main webbing and more so the ease of adding 4 bolt mains. Really I would not pick a D0VE-A over any of the others unless I intended to add 4 bolt mains in which case would use a D0VE-A.

A block that sonics good and thick is more important in my view if just going to be a two bolter...

Steve
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,547 Posts
I have all 3 blocks (wish I had a Boss) next to each other. D0ve without "A" on front, D0ve with "A" on front and D0ve scj 4 bolt. All are 1970 date codes with stock bore.
I can't see any thickness differance. What should I be looking for?
The block pictures that you have posted are of D0VE-A blocks which all have the Boss 429 bulkheads, that's why they look the same.

My digital camera disappeared some time ago and I haven't purchased a new one yet, so I don't have exact images of the two different blocks. If it's alright with you I'd like to take your images that you posted above I can put together a thread which shows the differing features of the two bulkhead types side by side.

Paul
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,547 Posts
Yes sir, your welcome to the pic's. more upon request.
Thanks, I'll get this done next week (leaving right now on a road trip over the weekend).

So, there are D0ve blocks, D0ve-A blocks (as seen on side casting) and D0VE-A (on side casting) blocks with an "A" on front?
The suffixes in the Ford engineering revisions are usually not considered critical by us performance enthusiasts. That "A" on the raised square pad is a feature found on D0VE blocks which is sometimes there and sometimes not there.

Paul
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top