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i think this happens when people think the mig welder does all the work for ya and all you have to do is hold the trigger and move the handle along where you are welding.he probably had a muffler shop weld them on for him.
 

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unless you have a 220v mig i don't think you should be welding those part at all with a mig welder.

i have a nice lincoln mig, but it doesn't have enough umph to weld parts like that. at least not without bevel grinding and such.

for this kind of welding i still much prefer a stick welder, maybe because this is what i grew up with.
 

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I have a 180 Hobart, I have used mig on many 4-link/ladder bad plates on rear axles. I make it a practive to wrap the corners w/weld and I stick weld several areas in the inner sides of the plate where the you can't reach w/mig to be sure. I have never had any problem with them braking.
 

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"You too can turn your boring crapmaro into a low rider in time for the holidays!" :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:


If your not careful it's damn easy to produce a cold weld with a mig welder. The wire/arc needs to be at the leading edge of the molten puddle as you move forward filling the joint/seam. A cold weld/lap/shunt can happen when too much of the molten weld puddle gets ahead of the advancing wire/arc and you are basically trying to push the cooling weld puddle ahead of the wire/arc.

When this happens there isn't enough arc energy available to fully fuse the two parent metals together & also keep the weld puddle wet. This is because too much of the arc's energy is wasted continuously re heating the excessive puddle (ahead of the wire) as you try to push the puddle along.

In my opinion, most all Mig & Tig weld joints on thicker metals (such as a 4-link bracket to a .250" thick housing axle tube) really should have some amount of a bevel (or small air gap if a bevel can't be done) at the weld joint. Mig needs a larger bevel than Tig to help with the weld penetration. The best Mig wire to use is the solid E70S-6 wire (flux core is for farm equipment, not race cars). A CO2/argon mix gives you a cleaner weld with less spatter, but also gives you less heat penetration than straight CO2 does.

Putting tack welds where your going to start a weld pass can initially create a cold weld at the start of the weld. With a perfect fitted weld joint tack welds (if possible) should be placed where a weld pass will end. This way by the time you finally reach the tack weld, the parent metal & the puddle will be at full temp and the arc/wire will easily melt the tack into the approaching weld puddle.
 

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Good advice Dave,
I was a Union Ironworker Instructor before I retired from the trade. When I taught them to weld it was Stick first, when you learn that then Mig. A lot of people start with Mig because there's less 'work' involved and skip the basics. The guy who badly botched that rearend was damn luck it happened out of the gate instead of at the other end, like dfree pointed out. Maybe it will act as a lessen to the guys who watch the video to practice a little before they jump into something that can cause dire consequences if it's not permormed correctly.
Good video.

GT300TD
 

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This was an excellent video which shows what can happen in a race car. This guys car looks pretty fast too. He did a good job in the burnout and stuff just not such a hot job in the welding department.

Again it just goes to show you that anything can happen and also why street racing can be so dangerous. What if it happened on the top end at a race track, that's bad. What if it happened on the top end on the street, how far would the axle go before it was stopped by something?

He was lucky and his reaction was very funny, "SHIIIIIIT!", exactly!
 
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