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Discussion Starter #1
this is one of those age old questions. Its still unclear to me whats the truth and whats not.....I've always been told to never lay a crank on its side and should be either stood on end, stored in block, or hung straight up and down........I have heard what I just stated and also I've heard that its just a "wives tell", that no harm could come. Now whats the REAL TRUTH???
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
mustangsandfords magazine says:

Laying A Crank On Its Side
Absolutely never lay a crankshaft on its side-not even for a few minutes. Crankshafts should always be stored standing straight up or hanging from a storage fixture. Laying a crank on its side will cause permanent damage.


engine builder joe mondello:
Once the caps are removed, remove the
crank by lifting it straight up and setting it down standing up on it’s flexplate mounting flange. Never lay​
a crank down flat for any period of time; it will become warped up to .010 to .015. Now you can examine



copied from a forum:


Even the stoutest metal will "creep" under continuous stress. This is a process where the macro metal does not see enough stress to cause permanent deformation. On a micro (atomic) level, however, distinct atomic bonds do see enough stress to cause these bonds to break and create a deformation on the atomic level. Over a period of time, these atomic level deformations add up and can be measured at the macro level.

What you have with a crank laying on its side is a relatively heavy object resting on a few points (due to the geometry of the counterweights and throws) with relatively large spans unsupported in between supports. Over time, the crank will "creep" out of shape.

IMHO, the best method to store a crank would be on the mains using v-blocks (precision machined and perfectly in line with one another). Second would be in the block assuming the block is straight and properly supported. Finally, stand it on end or hang it from the snout. I would never lay one on its side for storage unless I was planning on having it machined.
 

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I wonder on this one a lot. The crank is on its side resting on a few points in the block, but I suppose it is the "right" points. A new crank has what 2 chunks of foam? 1 on either end and that will not cause it to sag? I find it hard to believe a few minutes would damage it.

Still, I have always kept them in the block or standing upright.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I wonder on this one a lot. The crank is on its side resting on a few points in the block, but I suppose it is the "right" points. A new crank has what 2 chunks of foam? 1 on either end and that will not cause it to sag? I find it hard to believe a few minutes would damage it.

Still, I have always kept them in the block or standing upright.
I would like to know also....I found some stuff as I have posted........but still no hard evidence for "any length of time"......or just a "few" minutes...but I would really like to know. I can see after a few months/etc. But just a little while seems a good debate.
 

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This is a good topic and I know I am curious how this will pan out. Although they say to never lay a crank on it's side, could that possibly be an attempt to keep people from getting into the habbit of leaving the crank on it'a side. If left for a long length of time I could see it distorting the crank. When I sent my block to the machine shop to get 4 bolt mains installed they had my crank ( luckily hanging from a rack ) and block for 10 months.

Gary
 

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Stored one in a box on its side for 10 years just pulled it out & checked Straight as an arrow.
Think about this does your crank run in your motor in a vertical position. (Standing up) ;)
But in a engine it is evenly supported along the main bearing line. Laying flat you have the counter weights in different planes.
 

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How about in a box for ten years? less than .0002 Run out .001 is industry acceptable standard.
You got lucky, there are such things you know.

I dont care if one or the other say to lay them down, old old greese monkeys said to stand them up, & thats what I'll do. I even bolt the gear back on an old used cam & stand it up.
I come from the foot hills of NC, where Nascar was formed & if it said ok to stand them by Junior Johnson or Curtis Turner, guess what I'm going to do.

On another note though, just any ol machine shop tell you to lay it down & then in the end it get bent, guess what, more money in their pocket cause you got to replace it.
Neil
 

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I vote for B.S.
A crank can take 2000+ psi in cylinder pressure without taking a permanent twist.

If its hanging from the flange all the weight is trying to bend it from the topmost journal intersection - or from the bottom if standing. But sitting for fifteen minutes - or fifteen years on its side is somehow gonna turn it into spagehetti.

I suspect that they are stored standing up because they take up less room that way in the shop. And the urband legend took hold from there....
 

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OK, but when the crank is setting on the end, bottom, mounting flange(whatever its called) isn't almost all the weight still being supported by one of the journals close to the bottom? You would think that would distort it as well since the bottom most rod journal is not in the crank centerline and supporting the weight of the entire crank above it.

Dave S.
 
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I thought we have put this one to rest ???

this is the place to say " you should always search the item you are inquiring about before posting " because we have been here before ... two schools of thought .. If a crank can bend from sitting on its side ( you really need to determine wether it is supported by the counterweights or the ends of the crank ) then it can just as easily bend from sitting on its end because all the weight of the crank is on the last throw .... bottom line , if a crank can bend from sitting its end or its side I dont want it in my engine ..... since all this is a fairy tail please dont lose any sleep over it , I dont and I have as many sitting on end as I do on their side .. and I sleep just fine ....
 

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I second Barry R's opinion,checked them that have been laying down for

years, no more out of tolerance then those stored vertical.

Remember metal has a"memory" and wants to return to it's original form

once pressure is removed. I am at the moment trying to adjust my titanium

glasses frames no matter how hard I try they return to original shape.The

dreaded metal memory syndrome!

J Y/b

32 Ford roadster

32 3window coupe

71 GT Torino

27 Ford roadster Dry Lakes delux

F350 diesel dually

Focus ST
 

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I'am in no way any kind of expert on this subject BUT,I do agree w/Barry and Adney. BECAUSE of this subject I was given a perfectly good 4.15 BBF crank from a mud drag racer that blew his new engine on it's maiden run. Well, he took the engine apart in 1997 and never put it back together. I heard he had some BBF parts that he might sell so I looked him up. Sure enough he had this crank thrown in a corner of his shop w/journals wrapped up but it had been lying on it's side for 10 yrs. He told me I could have it for free if I bought the 6 good pistons and 8 alum. rods.So I figured also that the crank was junk,but my machinest said he figured it was fine. Sure enough I watched as he chucked it up, and he said it was good as new.:eek: So now I just store them standing upright to save space:)
 
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