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Discussion Starter #1
Just replaced the 3:50 ratio rear gears with 4:11's in my 1967 Mustang. Typically the car doesn't spin off the line with 16 lbs in the MT 28 x10.5 x 15ET drags. On Sunday it spun badly and eventually I had to go down to 12 psi and it was still spinning at the line.

It has been mentioned before that my car's front end doesn't rise much on launch. Can anyone recommend a front drag shock for a 1967 Mustang that might aid it hooking up a little better?

Also, my MT 28 x 10.5's are almost worn out. Do 3 year old slicks with close to 100 passes on them get less sticky? Any recommmendations on tires? I can't run bigger than 28" tall or 10.5" wide due to wheel wells.

thanks
 

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They will get harder if you're heating the dog poop out of them. A lot of people don't adhere to it but it's only necessary to do about a 3 second burnout, mostly to clean the tire and partly to warm it. If you aren't getting enough stick after that, maybe you need to go to a softer compound. IMHO. Yeah, I know.....everybody likes to see the John Force half trackers....but he has tire sponsers... ;)
Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #4
no fun

They will get harder if you're heating the dog poop out of them. A lot of people don't adhere to it but it's only necessary to do about a 3 second burnout, mostly to clean the tire and partly to warm it. If you aren't getting enough stick after that, maybe you need to go to a softer compound. IMHO. Yeah, I know.....everybody likes to see the John Force half trackers....but he has tire sponsers... ;)
Rob
Too much?

How about drag shocks? I've also heard some people remove their front anti-sway bar to get the front end coming up faster.
 

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I'm not sure if others have had this experience or not but I've found that I'll spin the tires easier when I do a John Force style half track burn out. Rob is right. All you have to do is about a 2 to 3 second burn out to clean them off. I'm not saying this is what you were doing. I'm just saying...
 

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Too much?

How about drag shocks? I've also heard some people remove their front anti-sway bar to get the front end coming up faster.
IMO removing the sway bar putting in urethane bushings, trick front springs and a set of 90/10 shocks is just a standard starting point. The brand is up to you.
 

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droop

Thats when u let the air out verses airing them up more tie on the ground ..If ur going to drive the car mostly on the street don`t the sway off...Bill
 

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Thats when u let the air out verses airing them up more tie on the ground ..If ur going to drive the car mostly on the street don`t the sway off...Bill
u can remove the link on one side of the sway bar at the track. u want 5" of travel in the front end measure the fender well at rest then jack it up till tire is just off and measure. rancho shock 9ways work well on leaf spring cars talk with cal-trac they can get u to hook
 

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Just replaced the 3:50 ratio rear gears with 4:11's in my 1967 Mustang. Typically the car doesn't spin off the line with 16 lbs in the MT 28 x10.5 x 15ET drags. On Sunday it spun badly and eventually I had to go down to 12 psi and it was still spinning at the line.

It has been mentioned before that my car's front end doesn't rise much on launch. Can anyone recommend a front drag shock for a 1967 Mustang that might aid it hooking up a little better?

Also, my MT 28 x 10.5's are almost worn out. Do 3 year old slicks with close to 100 passes on them get less sticky? Any recommmendations on tires? I can't run bigger than 28" tall or 10.5" wide due to wheel wells.

thanks
Yes old slicks get less sticky, how much depends on how they were treated burn out wise and how they are stored in the off season.
I like the Calvert Racing front shock.
http://www.calvertracing.com/frontshocks.php
I don't run a front sway bar and I drive my car anywhere.
Handling is however obviously sacrificed for takeoff traction.
I do however run 390 FE big block springs.
I found that the rear shocks are almost as important as the front, as my car has the Calvert rear shocks and will blow the tires away if they are set only two clicks to stiff. I don't have their rear leaf springs, but eventually plan to get them. If you aren't running Caltrac rear bars, I would get a set.
 

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Once again, ladies and gentlemen, "Doorslammers, The Chassis Book" by Dave Morgan.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-158/
Read it, read it, read it and read it some more.
Rob
I have that book and agree it's good.
I would also recommend having a friend videotape the takeoff.
It's near impossible to know EXACTLY what the chassis is doing from inside the car.
 

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I have that book and agree it's good.
I would also recommend having a friend videotape the takeoff.
It's near impossible to know EXACTLY what the chassis is doing from inside the car.
Quite true, there is no substitute for R&D and testing. Be that as it may, the science involved in getting a chassis to the point where it can be made to, and expected to, perform to a certain end result must be applied first. When the tried and true engineering parameters are applied in the design stage of a chassis build and are adhered to, there are very definate and repeatable results that can be expected and used to achieve a properly handling chassis. It's all science and applied mathematics. Apearently the OP doesn't have knowledge of these tools or else he wouldn't ask the disjointed questions that he has. Chassis science must be understood as a whole. There are no "one trick does it all" changes that will get a street car into the 6's (or any other #'s for that matter of fact). The factory uses certain design parameters and few of these parameters will be applied to a performance chassis, thus when changes are made they must be made et/al or they will be mostly a waste of time, money and effort. Education is the key.
Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quite true, there is no substitute for R&D and testing. Be that as it may, the science involved in getting a chassis to the point where it can be made to, and expected to, perform to a certain end result must be applied first. When the tried and true engineering parameters are applied in the design stage of a chassis build and are adhered to, there are very definate and repeatable results that can be expected and used to achieve a properly handling chassis. It's all science and applied mathematics. Apearently the OP doesn't have knowledge of these tools or else he wouldn't ask the disjointed questions that he has. Chassis science must be understood as a whole. There are no "one trick does it all" changes that will get a street car into the 6's (or any other #'s for that matter of fact). The factory uses certain design parameters and few of these parameters will be applied to a performance chassis, thus when changes are made they must be made et/al or they will be mostly a waste of time, money and effort. Education is the key.
Rob
Rob,

I haven't been lectured to like that since I was in grade school! There are plently of fairly easy going guys at our drag race club that are more than happy to answer questions from neewbies such as myself. I'll save my questions for them. This site is weird. Sometimes I watch people ask questions and they are treated almost with kid gloves, polite answers even if the questions are maybe a little off the beaten path. then other times a question is asked and the senior members seem to almost take offence to the question being asked. Maybe a guy that doesn't have 16" wide tires, 4500 carbs, P-51 heads and 20 years of drag racing knowledge should take a drag racing course before asking questions on this site!

As far as engineering and applied science, I have post secondary education in both plus 35 years of experience in Engineering and Maintenance departments in heavy industry. I understand both but at our post secondary schools in Canada, engineering programs don't cover traction issues on drag race cars, hence my questions. Don't worry, I'll not bother you with disjointed questions again!!!!
 

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I hope Rob didn't mean to be rude and it was misread, I have been learning alot lately about hooking up a leafspring car and Calvert Racing was a huge help with both advice and a few parts. I had one of the techs check out my You-tube videos of my truck and got great advice. I am new to trying to hook up with leaf-springs so they were great. My last truck was mini-tubbed with ladderbars and coilovers which is alot easier than leaf-springs, there are still some tricks to them and I had advice from an old dragracer that worked perfectly. Before that I was on a Fox-chassis which is pretty easy to hook up.
 

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Once again, ladies and gentlemen, "Doorslammers, The Chassis Book" by Dave Morgan.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-158/
Read it, read it, read it and read it some more.
Rob
X2 and nothing was ment to be rude.

I have been in the stagging lane and listen to alot of guys that think buying name brand parts is going to get them down the track faster.

A video of your car in the burn out box and leaving the starting line will show you where to spend you time and money.

Having read the book makes it alot easyer to spot your problems.
 

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460....I didn't mean for it to sound like a lecture...and please don't be offended by my statement about you're questions being disjointed. The point I was trying to make is that everything is related to each other when it comes to setting up a drag chassis, changing one thing changes alot of things that may or may not be what the car needs. Many times people think that just throwing some brand name parts at a car will make it faster. I did not mean to insinuate that you were one of those people. In fact you apear to be an educated person so I'm sure that you'll understand about all things being interrelated. Seriously, purchase the book, it has a plethora of information in it. After absorbing it the little light bulb will be burning brightly and you'll snap your fingers and exclaim "Eurika!" lol Once again, no offence was meant.
Rob
 

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I understand the situation quite good, but after I have read this topic, I was really going to order the book, "Door Slammers: The Chassis Book". I would have allready bought the book, but $30.95US books freight to here Finland south from "north pole" $39.95US, wow. If you don't mind guys, I will be asking you guys many questions without the book. Seriously taken, I will get the book once I order some other stuff too, allmost 40 smackers from freight is just ridiculous.

I have the situation, that I have plenty of good parts installed & going to be istanlled but these nice parts does not adjust themselves without my test, study & work. I have received many good advices from here, I will be reporting how many seconds my timeslips went slower!!! :)

Thanks.
 

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After $400 dollars worth of shocks and a $150 set of traction bars the best part to get my truck to go down the truck was a $13 set of shock extensions that allowed me to get better than the magic 5 inchs of droop. That simple part made my truck go from going sideways at 110+mph and coming out of the hole then spinning after 3 feet out to dead hooking and being completely driveable.
 
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