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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if any of you have had experience with the "Evans NPG Coolant" that is touted as having (I believe) a 360 degree boiling point and lasting "forever"?

I am currently looking at the cooling system for my 545 project and exploring as many options in that area as possible.

I understand the product is quite expensive (relatively speaking) but it seems to have some good reviews on some of the "boards."

Any inputs?

Thanks!


BT
 

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evans coolant

I used it in my blown 473 when I first built my truck. Its best to use when the motor is fresh from the machine shop with no old water/residue in it, as you can't have more than 1% water in it for it to work correctly. Its 100% prop/glycol, no eth/glycol in it. Its boiling point is very high so you don't get any hot spots on the cyl. walls or in the heads, all the metal is bathed in fluid. Its very expensive, out here it was $30/gal and went up to $40/gal so the local speed shop stopped selling it, nobody was willing to spend that much, the average guy doesn't need it. I had to order extra from "Moon" out of so cal. It does work, you can really control detonation with it, you just have to get used to "re thinking " what water hot and whats Evan's coolant hot meaning your motor runs 230 degrees on it compared to 180 on water/glycol ; the motor can now operate in the 230-270 range with no damage, no detonation. It takes getting used to seeing your gauge reading that hot. You don't have to run a pressure cap on the radiator either, most guys use a 8lb just for the heck of it. Its a totally different convection than water/ethl/glycol . The only reason I stopped using it was convenience , I pull my motor down often, and the cost was the big factor. I filtered mine and put it back into the Evans bottles, and stored it in my shop, I may go back to it one day when I can keep extra on hand. You need a high volume water pump and a high flow radiator, aluminum big tube is best for the best results. Its a good product, many of the circle track guys are using it and can tape up the nose of the car for aerodynamics. It has a really good reputation in that type of racing. Good luck with your motor! Greg blown 473
 

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Discussion Starter #3
THANKS, Greg!

I was not aware of the high temperature reading that is possible (probable?) when using the product. None of the research I had done had spoke to that particular situation.

Since mine is a completely new motor with new radiator, lines, pumps, etc., I think I am going to go for it. I will order an extra gallon at the time of the build.

It also seems that a lot of the motorcycle racers uses this product.

Again, thanks for your input.


BT
 

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Yes yor motor does run at a hotter temp, but does it safely because of no boiling points in the motor, no steam pockets can form. It just takes getting used to seeing that gauge reading 230 and thinking this is normal. Evens has a good web site and a very good catalog they put out with lots of info, you might check it out. I guess the best thing is ZERO corrosion ever , thats nice with expensive aluminum heads, manifold,timing cover, water pump, etc. No crud build up on cyl. walls or in the radiator.
 

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Say - could you use it on a street driven car, assuming that some water from condensation or an idiot messing with it will eventually get in? Can the system boil off any water contamination, or is it mixed in like w brake fluid and then has to be totally flushed?

Less heat out the radiator should mean more heat pushing the piston down and a little less fuel to do it.
 

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Its critical to keep water out, its water that boils and creates steam and hot spots on the metal. Evans has a tool they sell to determine how much water is in your system, and it must be removed for their product to work correctly, thats why its easiest to do it when the motor is just going in the vehicle. It can be done on a vehicle using water or water/eth/gly, but you have to go through a removal process first, its not a big deal, but you do have to do it by a process of flushing. Once you have the system done, condensation isn't a problem, but I would mark the cap so no one puts water in a ruins your expensive coolant. Evans has pre made kits for cars too, coolant, radiator, pumps, all spec. applications, their catalog is worth a look. I researched their product a lot looking for every detonation advantage I could get in a blown application and they have every base covered, high compression engines, turbos nitrous, all can be helped with their stuff. If your in a area of the country that gets freezing temps too, this can be a big storage advantage as well. For cars that are show vehicles mostly and don't get run much the advantages to not having any water and its corrosion are obvious.
 

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Its critical to keep water out, its water that boils and creates steam and hot spots on the metal. Evans has a tool they sell to determine how much water is in your system, and it must be removed for their product to work correctly, thats why its easiest to do it when the motor is just going in the vehicle. It can be done on a vehicle using water or water/eth/gly, but you have to go through a removal process first, its not a big deal, but you do have to do it by a process of flushing. Once you have the system done, condensation isn't a problem, but I would mark the cap so no one puts water in a ruins your expensive coolant. Evans has pre made kits for cars too, coolant, radiator, pumps, all spec. applications, their catalog is worth a look. I researched their product a lot looking for every detonation advantage I could get in a blown application and they have every base covered, high compression engines, turbos nitrous, all can be helped with their stuff. If your in a area of the country that gets freezing temps too, this can be a big storage advantage as well. For cars that are show vehicles mostly and don't get run much the advantages to not having any water and its corrosion are obvious.
AND it's designed patented manufactured assembled boxed shipped and installed in the USA. Can't find much of that these days.
 

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I used it in an 84 Mustang with a 12.5 to 1 70 Boss 302 in it. Worked great. Later working at Ford Advance Engine Design I was involved in assesing its usage. Price killed it for production engines. Think there was a part that came with the kit that absorbed moisture from the system that had to be removed from the system and baked in the oven to remove water. Did it so long ago dont remember it all.
 
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