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Discussion Starter #1
Hello - My thirsty 460 (on a 1987 F250) drains the 3310 (750 cfm) Holley at wide open. Yes, I could replace the stock electric fuel pumps but was wondering if there's such a thing as extra large float bowls I could install so I can get a complete 1/4 mile run before it bogs. Thanks!
 

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thens theres something wrong with your fuel system, its not recovering from fuel needed, larger bowls are not going to fix it
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thens theres something wrong with your fuel system, its not recovering from fuel needed, larger bowls are not going to fix it
Thanks for the reply. I put in a cam, intake, headers, etc. to increase the performance. Only after that did this start happening. It runs fine in all cases except wide open for an extended period. I just figured the stock fuel pumps (one in each of two tanks) can't keep up.
 

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install after market 5.0 hivol pumps, thats what I have done for 25 years in the efi 460 trucks
 

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and a reg to cut it down as needed
 

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theres other ways as well
 

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Discussion Starter #7
5.0 hivol
5.0 liter high volume gas pumps with a regulator - for this carburated unit? Is there such a unit that will fit the existing tank(s)? I even put a booster pump in line but that didn't help.
I'm seriously thinking of just adding a separate 5 gal auxiliary tank with a hi-vol pump I can switch on when needed. There's plenty of room under there.

Maybe I'll start a separate discussion on that if it's not already in this forum. Thanks!
 

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YES, BUT IF YOU added a booster pump and IT STILL does not work you have something wrong
 

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Discussion Starter #9
YES, BUT IF YOU added a booster pump and IT STILL does not work you have something wrong
I plumbed the booster parallel to the existing line where it pulls from the fuel pump output so I'm sure the fuel pump itself is impeding any extra flow. The booster needs a separate suction line from the tank to do any good. I'm just trying to resolve this without having to drop a tank, which brought up the interest in oversized carb bowls, if they even exist.
 

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I install a booster pump at the tank,and run thru my factory pump, doing this for 25 years, no issues, you have something else wrong
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If your booster is before the factory pump, that may be why it works. My booster is in the engine compartment and connected to the line after the pump.
When the gas line is disconnected at the carb, the flow is the same with or without the booster (I have an override switch to turn on the in-tank pump(s) without the engine running). It the tank pumps are off and the booster is on - no flow. Therefore, it seems that plumbing the booster after the tank pumps is ineffective.
 

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kicker pump needs to be near tank, they dont suck well thru the factory pumps,but work great to feed fact pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
kicker pump needs to be near tank, they dont suck well thru the factory pumps,but work great to feed fact pump.
Factory pump sucks from inside the tank. If I'm going to boost that pump I'll need to drop the tank. I may as well just replace it with a hi-vol pump like you mentioned earlier
 

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If you're running out of gas WOT,float valves are open and the pump is basically in free flow.I would think that the stock pump would be adequate.I'm thinking that you have a restriction somewhere between the pump and carb.This may be especially true since you have no increased flow with the booster and tank and none with the booster only.The tank switch valve could be the problem.
 

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If you're running out of gas WOT,float valves are open and the pump is basically in free flow.I would think that the stock pump would be adequate.I'm thinking that you have a restriction somewhere between the pump and carb.This may be especially true since you have no increased flow with the booster and tank and none with the booster only.The tank switch valve could be the problem.
Agreed. To the OP, just think of how many vehicles are out there running much quicker/faster (I'd imagine) then your truck does without the need for extra large float bowls. On my 450 hp FE daily driver, I ran a 3310 with a Carter mechanical "Musclecar" pump at 7 psi before going to EFI and I could hold it open as long as I wanted, road racing, drag racing, or just screwing around, and it'll pull 6200 rpm. Something wrong with your supply side. I'd be looking at the tank switch or something else. On my truck for example, I found some dingleberry had mounted a small fuel filter in the fuel line and had it looped up and on top of my fuel tank where I couldn't see it. Never know what kind of weirdness a previous owner has done.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Why did you need the mechanical musclecar pump for the FE? Was the stock one insufficient? I replaced the tank selector valve a few years after the rebuild. Turns out the valve was fine but the tank selector switch was bad. Anyhow, the starving problem only happened after the rebuild and was there before (and after) the selector valve was replaced. I did add a paper filter to the line before the carb but the flow is the same before and after the filter. This has "hot fuel handling" where the gas is pumped in a continuous loop. Maybe the vapor separator is letting to much gas go back to the tanks and not to the carb. I will check the flow 1) before the tank selector valve and 2) with the return line blocked and see if any differences.
The easiest way through this is to get the flow rate of the factory pumps and see what the rate is at the carb. If it's the same, I'll definitely need to boost it. Thanks!
 

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The stock pump took a s*** and I figured I might as well spend the extra $10 over a repro one from NAPA and get a good pump. When I've got the EFI set-up on, it works as a lift pump to feed my Fuel Command Center 2.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Wow - sounds like a nice set-up. Did you replace the carb with EFI? This engine has a dummy plate over where a manual pump mounts. Maybe I can put in a manual pump and feed that from the electric ones for more flow - would that work?
I don't recall if I omitted the eccentric when replacing the cam. I'll have to look into that further.
 

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Yes, I've got a Fitech on it with a Hyperfuel FCC2 for the sump/pump set up (well, I'm back to my carb for the winter, but that's another story). Here's an in process pic, that's the FCC2 on the passenger side by the firewall. I would look into just putting a mechanical pump back on your engine if it's still got the pump eccentric myself and be done with it.
efi3.png

efi1.png
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I could stare at engines all day - that looks nice. When it warms up I'll pop that dummy plate off and check for the eccentric. If it's there, on with the mechanical. Now, I just checked my Ford Shop Manual and it says the electric pump does 25 gph at 4.3 psi. The troubleshooting test says it should do a minimum of 16 oz/10 sec. (which is 45 gph). Something is off here. Anyhow, even before the vapor separator, it's definitely less than that - both pumps. Hmmm, maybe the in-tank filters are clogged? I'm going to get a gauge to measure the pressure and check the flow rates again (with a graduated cylinder). No more guessing. This may become a rather involved project if I need to drop the tanks. I guarantee some of the tank holding hardware/fasteners will break upon disassembly.
 
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