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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have purchased a 1972 f100 with a 460 big block. I am going through and learning my truck and my engine. I currently have an oil leak I am chasing down which I believe to be coming from the fuel pump or oil pan gasket. There is no oil leaking while it is just sitting it is after she has been running for a min. Anyways I was told by my husband I need a hobby outside of being a mom so I chose this truck. I am having a problem with her getting hot too, well my opinion of hot. She hits 230 at an idle and drops to 190 after I drive for about 10 mins. Like I said I am learning and I hoping to be able to get this truck all cleaned up and have it be my baby. I am not into all of racing and stuff I just want the horse power for cruising. So anybody that’s fine to just let me pick their brain or anything like that I would greatly appreciate it.
 

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Welcome aboard, and sweet truck!! 230 is a little warm. Sounds like a good time to determine if the cooling system is up to the task. What radiator is in the truck? Which thermostat is installed? Water pump age, coolant level and cooling fan type would be a good place to start!
 

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Welcome!! So just out of curiosity did you go out and buy this thing for a hobby or was it just sitting around your yard as somebody elses discarded project? Looks pretty sweet to me! Hopefully the oil leak is coming from the fuel pump because the oil pan gasket is a much harder fix. They do make 1 piece oil pan gaskests now and that's all I use myself. The multi piece gaskets are a lot easier to get leaking. 230 is hot. Couldn't tell if you had a fan shroud or not but that truck had plenty of front grill to keep that thing cool. It shouldn't be getting that hot at idle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I went out and bought this truck, looking things up and found some serial numbers. The only numbers I am finding on the block is 13 101 on the front drivers side. It’s have a sheath intake and trick flow valve covers. Radiator I am not sure what it is. Diving head first into the truck to work through my trauma healthily.
 

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She hits 230 at an idle and drops to 190 after I drive for about 10 mins.
Welcome! You certainly can't sneak-around in that truck. :p Assuming your temperature gauge is accurate; this is over-temp control range, and indicates a lack of airflow at low-speed, and improves with vehicle speed. Anything that limits the airflow will affect this symptom, from blockage in the radiator airflow path (bugs, bent fins, etc), lack of fan flow (bad fan clutch, wrong fan blade, blade on backwards, loose belt, etc), wrong or missing fan shroud, wrong or missing spacer (positions fan in the shroud), and so on.

There are a few other possibilities, but they are uncommon. See what you find and let us know how it's going.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This weekend I am going to replace the thermostat and look into getting a new fan. I will fill you guys in after I do that. I am a stay at home mom of three so I don’t get on here too often except for once or twice a week maybe so if it takes me a minute to let you guys know how it’s going that is why. Thank you so much for the advice I do appreciate it.
 

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Lack of pressure in the cooling system can also cause flow issues at idle. A new rad cap is cheap insurance. Black drains are often over looked, and sometimes (not common in 460s) the block rust and sediment can fill up the bottom of the block, lowering the cooling system capacity.
 

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This weekend I am going to replace the thermostat
I don't have the exact 1972 Ford Shop Manuals (FSM) in-front of me, but that year they likely installed a 162°F thermostat originally, as a HD application, except cold regions. They used "160" and "190" versions, and trucks usually got the 160. If you live-in and expect to use it in very cold weather, a 175° or hotter unit will make defrosting and heating a bit more effective. ;) The cooler thermostats spurred the 3000-mile oil change ritual due to the slower burn-off of oil contaminants on short trips, but most of us do that with any thermostat temp.
 

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This weekend I am going to replace the thermostat and look into getting a new fan. I will fill you guys in after I do that. I am a stay at home mom of three so I don’t get on here too often except for once or twice a week maybe so if it takes me a minute to let you guys know how it’s going that is why. Thank you so much for the advice I do appreciate it.
Hello Kmhull, you bought a nice truck. Before changing the thermostat I would check that your radiator coolant is about an inch from top when stone cold, the coolant is not muddy looking and radiator cap secured after checking fluid. Even if the coolant isn’t a nice color, my next step before changing a thermostat or coolant would be to check the engine timing. Based on the picture you posted, your engine does’t have a vacuum advance distributor, it is a mechanical advance distributor. If the engine doesn’t have enough initial timing it can run hot at idle. You most likely need about 16-18 degrees advance at idle with your mechanical advance distributor and about 34 degrees total advance give or take a degree or two. Problem with mechanical advance distributor on street machine is two fold, you need a vacuum advance distributor to help your motor run efficiently at part throttle and second to help with gas mileage. The vacuum advance gives your engine extra timing at low power settings to help with power and burn off more fuel efficiently. The other problem with a mechanical advance distributor like yours is it will seem like it’s having a hard time turning over during starting when it’s completely warmed up, and that is because it is having a hard time If you have the needed 16-18 degrees initial timing needed for it to be happy at low power and idle. You really don’t want more than about 10 degrees initial timing during start, but your engine wants more timing once it’s running at idle for any length of time. I would see how the temperature does at idle once you have checked the timing and adjust up to 18 degrees at idle. Also very important IMO, get yourself one of those cheep Home Depot infrared temp guns to verify what your water temp is at the upper radiator hose at the thermostat housing. If your engine is happy and temp is 180-195 at idle after adjusting timing, my next step would be to buy a vacuum advance distributor when possible.
I would put a wrench/socket on your fuel pump bolts and also just make sure the oil pan bolts aren’t loose, no need to over-tighten the oil pan bolts.
Hope this helps and your family has good time in new truck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Did some work this weekend, but unfortunately it was with the cooling system. Replace the fuel pump and now wondering how to cool my fuel to the carb. Right now it has the rubber hosing and it is resting on the engine so…. Trying to figure that out first. And thank you for advice on the timing, but I am going to have to read more about that before I try for that battle. Also with my learning I believe that there may not be a thermostat an it maybe free flowing. So long story short it will yet be another weekend before I tackle the cooling. Thank you for being so awesome you all. I “tuned” my carb, replaced the fuel filter and pump, and my psi gauge and I am idling so much better. Also stilling getting a little hot, but not as bad about 215 at an idle before I move and then right back down to 190 with like 2 mins at about 30mph.
 
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