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So I am working on a new stroker and I am planning to run E-85.
I am also running this car at 6000 feet with adjusted alt to between 8800 and 9000. What is the octane rating of E-85? I have seen some posts here that say 105?

So what is the max comp that can be safely run? Is 13.1 too much?

Thanks.

Clay
 

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I would say it's too much but I don't mess with E-85, Cale should probably chime in on this one.
 

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13:1 is not to much. I'm running real close to 13:1 with E-85 and I have no issues. I even smack it with Nirtous.

Here is the thing though... E-85's octane rating can very depending on where you get it or just the batch of E-85 itself. You may get it out of a pump one day at 107 octane and then go back a week later to the same pump and you will get 103 octane. People who run E-85 usually keep a tester with them so they know exactly what they are putting in the tank.

Also something to know about E-85 is it gets real nasty in a hurry. It sucks moisture out of the air so it it important to keep the tank tightly sealed. And even then it will still absorb moisture. I learned this the hard way. I left my motor sit for about a month without starting it with E-85 in the carb. When I went to start it well.... It wouldn't start. I ended up taking the fuel bowls of the carb to see if it was dirty. And it was. I had gunk everywhere in there clogging up the jets. Now what I do before turning it off even for a few days is turn off the electric fuel pump and then let it idle until the carb runs out of gas so the carb ends up sitting dry. I never have a problem now. Also you have to know that E-85 will not work with any rubber parts. Well it will but only for about a week or so before it kills the rubber parts in the fuel pump or whaever else you have the fuel running through that has rubber in it. You DO NOT want to run that stuff through regular 3/8 inch fuel line. The fuel lines either need to be Stainless steel (not just steel either) or a rubber line that is rated for E-85. If you do anything else you will not be doing it long. It is some nasty stuff and will eat through regular rubber. If you know anybody that runs methanol just ask them what they do. You will need to do the same things for E-85.
 

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All braided line isn't the same but most will take E-85. I'm using the braided line from Summit for both the supply and return lines. Works just fine. You just need to find out who manufactured it and if it is compatable. I was just saying that regular 3/8 rubber fuel line from Autozone or a place like that will not work.
 

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Here is a link to an ebay auction. I'm guessing if you Google E-85 tester you will get more returns.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...f79d3a6&itemid=120500665660&ff4=263602_263622

Keep in mind it isn't the octane that you are checking for. You are actually checking the ratio of Ethanol to Gas. E-85 as you probably already know is 85% Ethanol and 15% gasoline. However the oil companies screw this up all the time. That is why you have to check it. You may very well be getting E-75 (75% ethanol and 25% gasoline). It is the different ratios that then affect the final octane rating. Hope this helps.
 
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