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Discussion Starter #1
any builders out there? I know a year or so ago it was a lot more expensive to go with metal studs, but metal prices have come down. What are the disadvantages of metals studs? Is it true that you can get cheaper insurance costs with metal framing because of the reduced fire risk?
 

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Disadvantages are minor, and mostly a matter of getting used to them. They are a little more "unfriendly" in the sense of worrying about eye, hand etc. protection...no big deal, but it is working with metal vs. wood. :) I'm a bit more paranoid about my eyes with metal. Dunno why as sometimes sawdust can be pretty difficult to extract too.

You have to think & plan a bit more in terms of wire & pipe routing...again no big deal.

The last disadvantage I can think of is during sheetrocking...professional drywall crews, if you've ever watched them, could care less about driving the screws straight- it's all about speed. Drive a screw at too high an angle on a metal stud & it simply walks. For the most part it doesn't matter...but if one of the crew is an idiot or newbie, you tend to curse a lot when you are taping behind him. :D

I've been told yes & no on the insurance deal. It probably depends on the rest of the construction materials.

I might add that as a traditionalist, I prefer to work with wood framing, but there's no particular reason why. I can say that it's nice to go through a bundle of metal studs & not have to separate out 30 for blocking because they're too warped or twisted to use.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thats good info, thanks. What about costs currently?
 

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Right now (for here at any rate), wood still has a slight advantage. Less waste/scrap with metal, but a higher price, enough that it makes a difference.

One other thing, for me at least, is that if you mess up a metal stud, say by cutting an access hole in the wrong place, you often have to replace it. You may be able to salvage part of it, (as you can with a wood stud). But, if you mess up a wood stud in the same way, you can often brace it or sister one in next to it...sometimes it's just easier or quicker.

If this is for a personal project for you, a shed or garage, I wouldn't let any of this influence you at all...basically whatever makes you the most comfortable. For homes, wood is still largely the material of choice, and I don't see that changing much for probably 20 years.

Forgot to mention that I personally find it a helluva lot easier to properly insulate wood construction...spray insulation is very high around here & almost never used on anything that's not fairly sophisticated commercial use, so lesser metal-framed stuff gets foam sheet, usually.
 

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wood vs metal

Keep in mind if you got any electrical to put in, your gonna need different wiring methods which cost more.
Also if your gonna hang anything heavy on the wall or put a hand rail up, you may have to add some backing before you rock it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just my own opinion, but if you use wood studs and drywall, you're going to have one heavy *** racecar. LOL

qoute:
"A place for non-460 banter"
 

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I guess I have a differnce of opinion.

Been an industrial elctrician for 25 plus years and around both tin & timber construction most of them years.

Tin studs a preferred in comercial/industrial because it's cheaper, easier and safer

1. They cost more but they are quicker install and save labor costs

2. They are easy to move and relocate in chance error and for change orders

3. They are safer and meet fire code and need less fire wall protection and cheaper
insurance cost.

4. They are easier and faster to punch holes over drilling studs for electrical plumbing
and the fastening devices are quicker and time saving.

5. One disadvantage is they are not a sound deading/proof and esy to insulate as timber
walls are. You can hear everything in the next room.

6. And with tin studs you are not dry-walling ceiling it is all drop ceiling also but is good
for drop in lighting rathr than strip lighting or fixtures

Personally .. If this is a home or a small project I would stick to timber it would be cheaper
and your not worried about labor cost. And by the time you get familiar with the use of it the projects over and timber will keep it simple if your already familuar with it.


just my experiencs
 

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Discussion Starter #11
good advice guys thanks. This is for my house.

AZFairlane, I thought you were flaming me for not talking about 460's or racing. Seems like that is happening a lot more, recently. Unfortunatley I have to put my truck and 466 to the side for a while. I don't even look at the engine section anymore because it gets me fired up to start working on it again, and then reality sets in and I realize I can't do it right now. I really like the people on this board, so thats why I stick around even though I don't have racing or engine stuff to ask.
 

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as a new construction plumber, the wood studs are a lot more worker friendly. you need to buy all kinds of insulators and hangers to put it through metal studs. if anything is not done perfect it rattles and is super annoying, any water pipe expansion/contraction makes more noises. plus fitting 3" (I.D.) pvc is possible in a single width wall with wood studs, the circular shape drilled in the top and bottom plate supports the pipe, when drywalled it flexes around it (the drywall does) and all is good. you need a punch tool to run anything in metal studs, which most trades do not usually have unless they focus on commercial work- just my idea....a buddy did his basement in metal unknown to me...i showed up 2 do the plumbing and a 2 hr job was an all day circus- my opinion thats all
 

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I wouldn't suggest it in a residential home for several reason, conventional ceiling, door framing and sound deading.They simply dont transistion well with residental harware.
I agree. Metal studs for commercial and wood for residential.

Lumber has dropped considerably in last couple months. Im selling 2x4x93" Austrian spruce studs for $2.25 in bundle quantity -216 or 300 depending on mill. SY Pine can be had around $1.75 but I dont sell it because of quality.

Its sad even the best lumber comes from overseas.:(
 

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One problem with metal studs is one of heat transferrence. If you have to build under code for heating & cooling, you either have to lessen the number & size of windows & other penetrations, or thicken up yoru insulation. I built wood 2x6 & put lots of windows in my house instead.
 
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