460 Ford Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone suggest a good networking site. I am having problems with mine and I can't figure out if it is brand conflict or what.

Here is a picture of my setup.



One of the problems is I have more computers than the standard 4 port router can handle. I like Linksys products but everyone I have owned seems to quit shortly after warranty ends. My Belkin N1 network cards are junk and they offer no customer service at all so I will never buy another product from them. The router seems to be rather stable though. My linksys Phone router seems to have quit again. The phone port is not working and when I try to use the phone it locks up the internet connection for that router. I work out of town and I need this stuff to be dead reliable.

Questions and problems:

1. Computer 4 doesn't see the other computers on the network for filesharing.


2. Is a wireless access point as fast as a router?

I was wondering if it would be better to run a cable modem, then a 4 port router to an 8 port switch. Then I would have all kinds of room for expansion as well as adding just a phone adapter (with no router). I could also then add a wireless access point if needed.

http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=1&pid=495

http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=1&pid=490
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
When I try to make your chart larger it is unreadable. I think what you need is a hub . It will have more than 4 ports on it and it will plug into the router. I know those VOIP phones can be bandwidth hogs so in some places you might need a seperate DSL or Cable modem depending on what kind of speeds(kbps) are available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,319 Posts
I'm wondering if you might need a router with some more sophisticated firmware that can control the amount of bandwidth used by certain devices(phone) so that it doesn't use all of what's available thus slowing the internet access to a crawl for the other users.

DD-WRT and other aftermarket firmwares can do this sort of thing but not in a micro version as would run on a Linksys WRT54G after version 4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
digger460 said:
When I try to make your chart larger it is unreadable. I think what you need is a hub . It will have more than 4 ports on it and it will plug into the router. I know those VOIP phones can be bandwidth hogs so in some places you might need a seperate DSL or Cable modem depending on what kind of speeds(kbps) are available.

When you click the link under the blurry picture on the right is a "Full size" button. This makes it larger and clear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
We have had vonage since 2004 so it is usually reliable except for the fact the life of a Linksys product is about 1.5 years. I am just curious if having 2 routers "stacked" is causing some problems because I have to reboot my modems/routers weekly or my internet gets real slow. If I have to buy new stuff that is fine I just want it to work at maximum speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
I've done something like you are trying to do but I don't have the VOIP router. I have a D-Link DI-704P router and a Linksys WRT350N wireless router. The Linksys is a terrible router and so I use the D-Link as my internet connected router. I recently purchaced a new laptop with wireless N and wanted to use the Linksys router as a access point and additional wired connections. I have 4 wired PC's that need to share files, printers and the internet and well as the laptop.

Basically the Linksys is used only as a wireless access point and switch to provide extra wired ports.

What I did was:
1) Use a regular ethernet cable to connect one of the regular ports on the D-Link to one of the regurlar ports on the Linksys - NOT THE WAN PORT.
2) In the D-Link router under DHCP I assign a static IP address to the Linksys router based on the local network (LAN) MAC address. In my case since the D-Link router is 192.168.0.1, I assigned the Linksys 192.168.0.2.
3) In the Linksys router I changed it's default IP address from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.0.2.
4)I DISABLED the DHCP server in the Linksys.

IMPORTANT!!! I did all the programming of the Linksys while connected directly to it. I did the IP address last, since it would cause me to lose the connection. If you get to a point where you can't connect to the router, there will be a button to reset the router to factory defaults. Read the manual to find out how to reset your router.

Other important things to remember are to turn on WPA2 Personal security and use a decent password/passphrase on your wireless. And don't forget to set a password for the administration of your router.

Since I'm not at all sure how the VOIP stuff works, I'd probably use the linksys router as my internet connected router and the Belken as the wireless access point / switch. If you do this you will have to set up the Internet connection on your Linksys router to connect to your modem/ISP.

I had a quick look through the Belkin manual and it can be easily set as an access point only but I'm not sure if the wired ports work in that mode. I'd try it. There are good instructions on pg. 53 of the pdf version of the manual. This will be the easy method if it works.

Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
1. Your file sharing issue is due to the fact that your Linksys "router" (I use the term loosely) is not a full fledged router. It uses NAT and is no substitute for a proper router capable of routing this traffic effectively between subnets. End result is you have only minimal and basic connectivity between your two subnets (Belkin router subnet, Linksys router subnet).

Simple solution is to go buy yourself a simple unmanaged switch. Use a crossover cable to connect the switch to your router. Then connect two computers to the Belkin router, the new switch, and the Linksys VOIP unit, then connect your other two computers to the new switch. Problem solved.

I don't know what services you're running or hosting through this connection, but I do not feel QOS or COS is necessary for a simple general use home internet connection with minimal simultaneous users. There may be circumstances where you simply don't have the bandwidth for these devices with their intended uses to play nice together, but I doubt that's an issue. I'd expect the quality of your Cox connection to be an issue first (high latency, packet loss, etc.). If necessary DD-WRT is an option as Dave mentioned, though I haven't really played with that firmware myself.

I'm not sure exactly what you are asking in #2. I'll assume you mean wireless network throughput and range as compared to a router that has an integrated WAP. There is no difference due to that. The differences are in one product or technology to another. A 3com WAP may get better throughput than a Linksys WAP, but that doesn't mean the Linksys WAP is necessarily any slower than a Linksys WAP+router. Basically just read reviews for wireless hardware and select what has the best range, throughput, or whatever features are most important to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I bought a Linksys phone adapter with no router features (the only thing I could get locally). The phone ports on the previous Linksys phone router had crapped out. It all seems to be working fine right now.

I will do some research on ur suggestions because I still need more ports occasionally.

Thanks,
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top