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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I have a 1969 mustang that had a 429 in it. Long story short it lost oil pressure and once the pump was repaired the car started to run hot which it had never done before. I purchased a new 460 short block. Had the Edelbrock heads checks and tested. Installed a new roller cam and lifters. New Edelbrock air gap intake. Got it all together and it still runs hot. It has fuel injection and is set to idle at 14:1 which it does. It has a new march serpentine kit on it and has the water pump plate in place. I have tried 160-180 thermostats ( with and without holes) you can visually see the water flowing in the radiator. The radiator is a big aluminum radiator with dual 12” electric spal fans that are pulling and spinning the correct direction. It has a 50/50 mix coolant. It never ran hot before and now it does. Oil level has been verified, head gaskets are on correctly for sure. It heats up extremely fast. Have 3 different gauges in the manifold and they all agree it’s hot. Timing is set at 10 degrees. The weirdest part for me Is how rapidly it gets hot. Any help is extremely appreciated. I am at a loss at this point. Like I said as well it used to run cool with this exact same radiator setup and serpentine system.

Edit: would also like to add I had a brand new radiator for another project that is exactly the same and swapped that in and same issue still occures
 

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I wish I could help But I have the same problem and was just about to post when I saw yours.. I've had my set up for about 5k miles with No Problems and now that the ambient temps have hit the 90's and up, I'm having problems. My temp goes up steadily from 180 to 230 and would go even higher if I wouldn't shut it down. I'll list my problem in my own post so as not to hijack yours. But This Sucks!!
 

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Just a quick thought. You said you set your timing at 10* is that initial 10 + the 15 from the vacuum advance, thus being 25*? I can't see my timing marks, so I set them by advancing to spark knock and them retarding it. I recently re-set my timing and now wonder if having the timing to far Retarded would affect the cooling?? Hmmm theirs a lot of knowledge here, maybe someone will have the answer..:|
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just a quick thought. You said you set your timing at 10* is that initial 10 + the 15 from the vacuum advance, thus being 25*? I can't see my timing marks, so I set them by advancing to spark knock and them retarding it. I recently re-set my timing and now wonder if having the timing to far Retarded would affect the cooling?? Hmmm theirs a lot of knowledge here, maybe someone will have the answer..:|
No vacuum advance
 

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How fast is "fast" for heat up? and if I am to understand this right you have a new/different short block than the one you originally had trouble with. Need to ask have you tried running the engine without a thermostat (just for testing). It kind of sounds like to me that whatever was broke on the 429 you transferred over to the 460. I know you said you saw flow through on the radiator. But there could possibly be a blockage in one part of the system while coolant is still flowing through the radiator maybe a blockage in one of the heads? Is there a way to see if one side of the engine is heating up faster than another?
 

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I run dual electric cooling fans designed for a '98 Ford Windstar in my '79 Ranchero with a relatively mild 472 BBF and I can tell you dual 12" cooling fans are probably not enough to keep a BBF cool, just by what I have observed with using the factory Windstar 15.5" and 13.5" cooling fans. Mine do fine even with A/C here in central Fl, but I also use a 28" x 18" 3 core all aluminum radiator and 160 t-stat.

Like stated earlier by SPLUHAR, check head gasket orientation. Hope this helps.
 

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So I have a 1969 mustang that had a 429 in it. Long story short it lost oil pressure and once the pump was repaired the car started to run hot which it had never done before. I purchased a new 460 short block. Had the Edelbrock heads checks and tested. Installed a new roller cam and lifters. New Edelbrock air gap intake. Got it all together and it still runs hot. It has fuel injection and is set to idle at 14:1 which it does. It has a new march serpentine kit on it and has the water pump plate in place. I have tried 160-180 thermostats ( with and without holes) you can visually see the water flowing in the radiator. The radiator is a big aluminum radiator with dual 12” electric spal fans that are pulling and spinning the correct direction. It has a 50/50 mix coolant. It never ran hot before and now it does. Oil level has been verified, head gaskets are on correctly for sure. It heats up extremely fast. Have 3 different gauges in the manifold and they all agree it’s hot. Timing is set at 10 degrees. The weirdest part for me Is how rapidly it gets hot. Any help is extremely appreciated. I am at a loss at this point. Like I said as well it used to run cool with this exact same radiator setup and serpentine system.

Edit: would also like to add I had a brand new radiator for another project that is exactly the same and swapped that in and same issue still occures


first get the stat out of it, 2nd 10 deg is not enough, whats the total timing?
 

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So I have a 1969 mustang that had a 429 in it. Long story short it lost oil pressure and once the pump was repaired the car started to run hot which it had never done before. I purchased a new 460 short block. Had the Edelbrock heads checks and tested. Installed a new roller cam and lifters. New Edelbrock air gap intake. Got it all together and it still runs hot. It has fuel injection and is set to idle at 14:1 which it does. It has a new march serpentine kit on it and has the water pump plate in place. I have tried 160-180 thermostats ( with and without holes) you can visually see the water flowing in the radiator. The radiator is a big aluminum radiator with dual 12” electric spal fans that are pulling and spinning the correct direction. It has a 50/50 mix coolant. It never ran hot before and now it does. Oil level has been verified, head gaskets are on correctly for sure. It heats up extremely fast. Have 3 different gauges in the manifold and they all agree it’s hot. Timing is set at 10 degrees. The weirdest part for me Is how rapidly it gets hot. Any help is extremely appreciated. I am at a loss at this point. Like I said as well it used to run cool with this exact same radiator setup and serpentine system.

Edit: would also like to add I had a brand new radiator for another project that is exactly the same and swapped that in and same issue still occures
Is your oil pressure where it should be?
 

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So I have a 1969 mustang that had a 429 in it. Long story short it lost oil pressure and once the pump was repaired the car started to run hot which it had never done before. I purchased a new 460 short block. Had the Edelbrock heads checks and tested. Installed a new roller cam and lifters. New Edelbrock air gap intake. Got it all together and it still runs hot. It has fuel injection and is set to idle at 14:1 which it does. It has a new march serpentine kit on it and has the water pump plate in place. I have tried 160-180 thermostats ( with and without holes) you can visually see the water flowing in the radiator. The radiator is a big aluminum radiator with dual 12” electric spal fans that are pulling and spinning the correct direction. It has a 50/50 mix coolant. It never ran hot before and now it does. Oil level has been verified, head gaskets are on correctly for sure. It heats up extremely fast. Have 3 different gauges in the manifold and they all agree it’s hot. Timing is set at 10 degrees. The weirdest part for me Is how rapidly it gets hot. Any help is extremely appreciated. I am at a loss at this point. Like I said as well it used to run cool with this exact same radiator setup and serpentine system.

Edit: would also like to add I had a brand new radiator for another project that is exactly the same and swapped that in and same issue still occures
I once saw someone install a serpentine belt on improperly and it turned the water pump backwards which caused it to overheat, maybe you should check for that. Also some water pumps for older ford engines that came equipped with v-belts are designed to turn in the opposite directional. Perhaps you should check and see if it has the wrong water pump one it, as well.
 

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Collapsed hose? Also, use a temp gun and read the heads as it warms up. Try to find a hot spot. If your heads were checked, start thinking (horribly) about the block. check for cross contamination in fluids water/ oil. Also, You might have a small crack in a cylinder wall boiling out a spot in the block. After it cools pull the plugs and see if you have a wet cylinder or plug. Best of luck bro.
 

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it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to get that exhaust gas coolant kit that checks for exhaust gas in your coolant. If there is any exhaust gas in your coolant that either means the heads are not sealing. or there's a crack that they missed when they checked the heads for cracks, or the cylinder head is warped. You know not all machine shops are created equal sometimes they leave the crack checking to The apprentice who's usually some 18-year-old kid who really doesn't know too much about what he's doing, that means it's very possible that they missed a crack in the head.
So do the exhaust gas analyzer on the coolant first and see if it comes up with any exhaust gas in there. If there's exhaust gas in the coolant then the head's got to come back off.
Also like I said before make sure that the water pump is turning in the correct direction because Ford had two styles the v belt water pumps and the serpentine water pumps turned in different directions.
head gasket on backwards?
 

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Many years ago, I chased an overheating problem until I was ready to set the truck on fire and walk away. But for some reason, I decided to pull the water pump and examine it closely. To my surprise, I found that the impeller, which was supposed to be a press fit on the shaft, was so loose that it would spin. Quality control ain't what it used to be.
 

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Many years ago, I chased an overheating problem until I was ready to set the truck on fire and walk away. But for some reason, I decided to pull the water pump and examine it closely. To my surprise, I found that the impeller, which was supposed to be a press fit on the shaft, was so loose that it would spin. Quality control ain't what it used to be.
I have pulled a few w/sb impellers
 

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put an electric water pump
The lions share of the available electric pumps are for intermittent use and hover around 35gpm.On you big *** ford when the loud pedal is near the floor,that monster can utilize 70 gpm and not mind the gluttony.Davis has a remote pump that will handle that flow.But that does not address the air flow past the fins.Bernoullie figured this in 1738.In 1752 Euler further refined the postulation to its current form.So yea,I build systems,and I understand what I am doing.
 

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It would be nice to know what you consider "hot". I can't tell what part of the world you are in, but if you're in the northern hemisphere, August ambient is usually hotter than January ambient.
As mentioned, insufficient timing can cause overheating.
Improperly operating thermostats can cause overheating. Check them with a known good thermometer.
I once had an Oldsmobile engine that would get to 230-240F in the summer. In winter it was O.K. It was like this from the factory. The only cure was to remove the thermostat and block the bypass.
 
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