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Discussion Starter #1
New anti-roll (on steroids) from Mark Williams and Vanishing Point race cars. Damn cool idea & setup, makes the older style small 1" O.D. anti-rolls look like a toothpick!



The center "torsion bar" section is made from 3" O.D. tubing
http://markwilliams.com/detail.aspx?ID=1525
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ideas

I don't think the basic idea of an anti-roll to control torque rotational body roll can be traced to any one type of racing. The only thing that really changes is how the unit is mounted, wether you want it to flex some amount or be rigid with no flex, the lenght of the arms, etc, etc.

The first time I saw one on a drag car was in a magazine article done about Chris Alston's setup using an anti-roll on a 3-link Pro Stock car that they were building back in the '70's. But they kinda glossed over what the device was and what it REALLY did.

The drag racing anti-roll "secret" didn't really become common public knowledge to the adverage racer untill somewere in the '80's. And even then some mistakenly thought to be used as a torsion bar (spring) and not as an anti-roll.

Of course some passenger cars have had some kind of a device to controll body roll for quite some time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Rocker arm anti-roll

Gearhead, are you talking about a "rocker arm" style anti-roll assembly?

Rocker arm style anti-rolls do double duty, they prevent body roll and at the same time provide a way to hang the shocks well in front of the rear housing (closer to the C/G). This changes the leverage depending on the lenght of the rocker arm. The pic below showing a rocker arm anti-roll is from a Super Stock magazine 4-link tech article (11-92).



One down fall of this type of setup is that it's harder to adjust the two systems (shock vs anti roll) separately, adjusting one really effects the other.

What web site did you see the setup your talking about?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I see which one you were talking about now, that is a variant of the old rocker arm style anti-roll design.

The mono-shock setup would work OK on a light dragster. But I doubt you could support the rear suspension of a door car correctly, have the correct valving, and deal with the more violent suspension of the shorter/heavier door car with only one shock to work with.

More interesting chassis (and body) designs & ideas at Vanising Point's site. Check out their photo gallery & build pics.

http://vpracecars.com/informationPage.asp?whichOne=3
 

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I didn't mean the 'anti roll bar" was a NASCAR idea. The inovation of using an actual piece of tubing with ends welded on it to be used as an anti roll bar (which is why that bar is so big in diameter). It is something we have used and devolped on for years.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
merc 460: OK, I see what you mean, I learn something new every day here (LOL). I had thought the "left turn" guys had been using a smaller O.D. solid bar to allow some small amount of bar flex when limiting body roll because they needed some small amount of body roll for the car to work right in the corners.

Gearhead: Yup, Vanishing Point's chassis kits look damn good, as do Tim McAmis's stuff http://timmcamis.com/ If I didn't already have a tube bender to make my own stuff, I would probably choose kits from either of them. I do like McAmis's stuff a little better (bar placement & layout) but both company's designs are proven.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Chassis kits do have some fudge factor. But if they don't have a kit that's close to your body style, a number of the companys can bend something to fit your application & their components if you give them some measurements.

In the bad old days some of the chassis outlets only had a very limited selection of main hoop & halo roof bar sizes to offer. They would mix & match what they had and call it a "fitted kit".........that didn't fit very well.

How well a chassis kit fits also depends on if it's a back-half or a full chassis car. A back-half car can be harder to fit the bars close to the body & out of the way because some class rules require you to keep the interior & door panels. A full chassis car is easier to fit because you can cut/remove all the interior & inner body structure.
 
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Dave, I saw your link to Vanishing Points photo page. I kind of favor that 98 Mustang they got up there.. LOL!!! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Chris, you don't know how many times I looked at them pics a while back, scratching my last brain cell going "I know I have seen that 'Stang's pics posted somewhere else.....but where?" (LOL).

I didn't make the connection untill I finally noticed the cowl ducts. (D'oh)
 
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