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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All - New to the forum. I recently purchased a 1978 Lincoln Mark V with factory 460 and C6. I'd like to swap out the C6 for an overdrive transmission. This car is all stock, and I'm looking to improve drive-ability and MPG. I wanted to use the car for road trips mainly on the highway, where the speed limit is 75 and most people drive 80+. The car was built during a time when 55 was the national limit (the speedo stops at 80). I took a 40 minute drive averaging 75 and the engine seemed to be running hard and things smelled hot (only have idiot lights currently, but looking to install some gauges to monitor).

I've looked at the Gear Vendors option, and not willing to spend that kind of $$$. I've searched the forum for ideas, but most posts are 4+ years old or focused on racing/hi-performance. Looking for ideas to bring the RPMs in line with what the engine was designed for. Would like to stay in the $1000-1200 range if possible. Any suggestions would be appreciated!
 

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I don’t want to burst you’re bubble but I don’t see it being possible to perform that kind of swap with that budget. The only “bolt on” automatic OD trans for the 385 series is an E4OD which came in 2wd and 4WD trucks and van applications. With it being an electronic trans you will need a standalone controller (becontrols.com) which I believe runs upwards of $500 by itself plus you need to adapt a TPS to the carb and add a wiring harness.

A good low torque producing engine with the C6 and a set of 3.00-3.25 gears is the most cost prohibitive option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response. While researching older threads, there seems like some other options other than Ford transmissions (2004R, 700R4). The factory gearing is 2.50 from what I can tell.
 

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The problem with any other trans even a staying in the Ford family (AOD, 4R70W, 6R110, ect...) is that they require a bellhousing adapter which will eat up half of you’re budget and that’s with no trans and no controller if it’s an electronic trans. The E4OD is a good trans but it’s pretty big so it might be a challenge to fit it into some chassis.

The good thing about the 200r4, 700r4 and AOD (not AODE) is that they are not electronic so they don’t require a controller.
 

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I have a BBF to Chevy style bellhousing adapter and hub I might be selling. Was going to put a billet built 2004R behind my 552 but I'm quite certain that's never going to happen. Let me know if you might be interested in it and I'll see if I can dig it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd be interested, but guessing the shipping to Michigan would be quite expensive.
 

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The route I went was to get an 460 bbf to AOD adapter plate.
Got it from SpeedGems -pn FO102 Ford 429/460 to Ford AOD this is the most expensive part. Its part number FO102 Ford 429/460 to Ford AOD.

I used an 4r70w trans and torque converter that I removed from a 2004 mustang v6 (this has theSBF pattern) from the local junkyard for $150 , also in the price was the starter and driveshaft/yokes.
Used a transgo reprogram kit PN AODE-3, this makes the trans a full manual valvebody. Very easy to install with the instructions included. You wire up 2 electrical switches. 1 for 4th gear and another for the lockup for the converter.
Use a quicksilver ratchet shifter with a lokar selector shaft kit.
I payed $1500 for all this 2 years ago.

I have only ran this trans behind a 351w engine as the 460 combo has not been ran yet (this has been bolted together and mocked up to redo the exhaust ) however. On the 351w it was very good at cruising at 2600 rpm at 75mph in 4th gear and with the lock. My rear end is 3.73 gears and I run a 275/40r18 tire
 

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I'd be interested, but guessing the shipping to Michigan would be quite expensive.
I'll see if I can round it and the adapter hub up, it'll need hardware, which is how I got it. I got it used off here about 10 years ago, If I remember correctly they are ATI brand parts..... I just got some '60 Cadillac bumper sections that weigh about 100 lbs shipped from Michigan off eBay, and it was about $100 to get them here in two boxes.
 

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I'm not sure how much the RPM's are going to go down to make it worth the expense. The C6 in that thing had a 3rd gear ratio of 1 to 1. I'm pretty sure the rear end gears were like 2.90's or something. I personally don't think it would be worth it in the end with a stock motor but you could give it a shot if you just got to.
 

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Looking for ideas to bring the RPMs in line with what the engine was designed for.
In order to make a good decision for yourself, I think you need to separate the issues. The designed engine rpm did not change range from 55 to 70 mph speed limit changes, nor did chassis changes, except speedometer markings. Note that U-Haul trucks that ran this engine type would spin over 4000 rpm all day and night, back and forth across America, for 100s of thousands of miles. Unless also looking at that level of mileage, engine longevity is not a concern. Point being, rpm in itself is not a legitimate technical factor when rationalizing.

A different issue is your personal like or dislike for NVH (noise, vibration and harshness), and while the engine may be perfectly happy, you're not. This is a legitimate personal factor. This is a judgment call on your part, and entirely your determination of value versus costs.

Economy — while you may accept the engine being OK, and accept the NVH of 1:1 gearing, calculations of the engine's torque curve versus cruise rpm may reveal a possible opportunity to gain some highway fuel economy if many miles will be driven that way. Usually, this is a fool's rationalization, as conversion costs typically far exceed any long-term savings. However, it may make you feel better, and combine with NVH reductions to make it worthwhile… to you. Again, your judgment, as the car (if properly adjusted and maintained) will be 'happy' as it is. I hope this helps to sort factors in this common decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The designed engine rpm did not change range from 55 to 70 mph speed limit changes, nor did chassis changes, except speedometer markings. Note that U-Haul trucks that ran this engine type would spin over 4000 rpm all day and night, back and forth across America, for 100s of thousands of miles. Unless also looking at that level of mileage, engine longevity is not a concern.
I didn't realize the engines were designed for that. As this is just a comfy cruiser for summer road trips and car shows, I don't anticipate putting on more than 4-5k miles per year. Based on the amount of effort and cost involved, I think I'll just leave it stock. Thanks everyone for the input.
 

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You can do several things to the engine/drivetrain to increase performance without having to smash you’re piggy bank. An early timing set, properly curved distributor, complete tune up, possibly a carb swap, and a good flowing exhaust will net you more power and more efficiency.
 

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Thanks for the response. While researching older threads, there seems like some other options other than Ford transmissions (2004R, 700R4). The factory gearing is 2.50 from what I can tell.
I have 250 gearing in my 460 car.More than likely your issue is the timing chain and possibly plugged up exhaust.Go with a 69/70 chain set up,and dis connect everything south of the Y pipe and road test.some very good suggestions here.Do the cheap stuff first.lol
 
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