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i've never really painted much before, but what kind of steps do I need to do to prep it for painting, and is there any high heat resistent or anything like that kind of paint. can i just get ford blue paint from a ford dealer, or is there cheaper places, color code?. Do i need to prime the block first?
 

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(1) I set my engine on a engine stand.

(2) I scraped the large chunks off first.

(3) I used a hand held grinder with a wire wheel and worked every nook and cranny on the block until it was clean.

(4) Put a large catch-all pan underneath the engine and then started scrubbing it with solvent.

(5) Blew everything dry with a airgun.

(6) Repeated as necessary.

(7) Once I got the block as clean as I could, I then cleaned it off with a can of aerosol brake cleaner.

( 8 ) Went to AutoZone and bought 3 cans of Engine Block Ford Blue and some masking tape.

(9) Masked off everything I wanted to protect and wiped the block off one more time with the brake cleaner sprayed into a clean shop towel.






I hope this helps. :D

:cool:
 

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If this is a rebuilt engine you can just make sure the engine is oil free with a laquer thinner and use a spray can of engine paint. If your doing a restoration. I always seal it up first with an epoxy primer. Following this I like to use PPG Concept.

With either paint try to put on a good wet coat but not too heavy. The thicker the paint gets the greater chance of it wanting to peel later due to the heat. Always remember to mask off whatever you don't want covered with a tape e.g. exhaust ports etc. Also remember to put the plugs in so you don't get paint in the threads or worse the cylinder.
 

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ngates0516 said:
i've never really painted much before, but what kind of steps do I need to do to prep it for painting, and is there any high heat resistent or anything like that kind of paint. can i just get ford blue paint from a ford dealer, or is there cheaper places, color code?. Do i need to prime the block first?
You don't need to go to the ford dealer for paint, but don't use house/hobby paint either.

Most auto parts stores have a rack of automotive spray paints including "engine enamel" spray paint. I'd recommend 'engine enamel' on most exposed engine parts EXCEPT any exhaust system parts; like manifolds or headers. Exhaust system parts should get HIGH-HEAT paint only.

Usually the paint rack at the parts store will have a "paint code" book or such to indicate 'Old Ford Blue' or 'New Ford Blue',,,, but there are no "color rules" (unless you're planning on it being "correct as original", then you'll need to research what color each part came from FoMoCo) just pick what color you like/want (well, no,,,,there is a rule: You CAN NOT paint it chevy orange! :wink: ).

My parts store handles the 'Plasti-Kote' paint brand and I like the 'FORD BLUE #205". Other good auto paint brand names usually available are: Dupli-Color and VHT. Excellent mailorder automotive spray paints are also available from: www.eastwood.com

Which ever paint brand you get - and this may sound silly - but you should follow the directions on the can (it's funny how many folks don't seem to ever read the can directions) regarding part cleanliness and working temperatures. Where most folks get in trouble with painting any stuff is not getting it clean, clean, clean. As Johnny Ray explained earlier, hose it down with brake cleaner to degrease it once all the flaky rust & visible crud is off of the surfaces.

Usually, the can will not mention using primers for engine enamel or high heat paints. However, I usually will spray a light coat of light-gray primer intended for "bare metal" use even if the part isn't totally bare metal. I prime the part - then no sooner than 24hrs - I'll paint the part with the engine enamel.

I wear clean cotton gloves and try to hang small parts by a wire (bent coat hanger works well) so as to not get fingerprints on the freshly degreased surfaces; KNOW that the paint WILL peel later if you handle the parts with your bare hands then paint,,,,because your fingers WILL leave residual skin oils on the surface and the paint won't stick well. Bigger parts you may have to paint in steps or stages; in other words, you'll paint two sides & let them dry a day, then flip the part over and paint the other two sides, etc.

Prior to priming/painting, tape off (don't paint) any surface that will be inside the engine, will be exposed to motor oil or get a gasket - such as the surface where the cyl heads bolt on, where the oil pan bolts on, timing gear area, the exhaust and intake manifold surfaces on the cylinder head, etc. When painting a part like your engine block, be aware that if you have it on an engine stand - you need to turn it 90* a couple of times to get all the residual oils to run out before the final degreasing. If you don't , then when you turn it while in the painting stage, the oil will seep out onto your cleaned surfaces and now you're painting on/over an oil run..... Don't ask me how I know this... :oops:

Personally, I like to paint all cast-iron engine parts with the blue #205 and any aluminum parts (timing cover, intake, etc. ) with silver engine enamel. I would NOT recommend you paint your distributor or the carb.....just because... :wink:

Good Luck!
StickBBF :)
 

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I don't know what you are planning paintwise. I painted mine with the same paint as the outside of my truck. I had problems the last time I painted it with the high build surfacer that separated apart looking like this


This time I skipped the surfacer and went directly over velvetseal. Hopefully it will stay this time (don't know for sure):lol:

 

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Fordguy,

From the looks of your pictures you might have gotten the paint a little too thick causing it too peal. If you are spraying conventional automotive paint directly over bare metal It might now stick very well.
 

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I used a product called urofill. It is a really high build urethane surfacer that I sprayed on to smooth out all the grinder marks. That is what separated because when you knocked off the loose chips, the urofill would be stuck to the back of the blue and still be on the block also. That is why I eliminated that step this time. I figured it would still look okay without it after that happened, so I stripped it all and repainted it to peoples suggestions. Use a good etching primer and spray your color straight over that.
 

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Didn't see it mentioned but when I painted mine old ford blue I went over it with 4 coats of high temp clearcoat.It stayed nice looking for 5 years now and the clearcoat changed the color hue a bit darker and looked very nice.
 
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