460 Ford Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering how to tell a steel crank apart. Casting #'s? It was in a 27' motorhome. I have heard that it should have one, because it has truck rods and it's application. Any help on this? Thanks,
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,012 Posts
The only Ford Steel cranks came in the heavy truck motors. They have a larger front snout. Your motor home almost certainly has a passenger car type 460 which will have a cast crank.

dkp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Forge I.D.

Standard rule of thumb; castings are from metal poured into a mold and will have a fine (1/8" or so) line on the unmachined surfaces.
Forgings are billit material hammered into a die to shape material and will have a wider (1/2" or so) seam on unmachined surfaces.
You can see this on crank shafts, spindles and even on connecting rods of small engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I didn't think it was, but figured I'd ask to make sure. A steel crank would have a different timing cover and balancer....a buddy had an F-700 crank and it was totally different......damn....that sucks. O well, Thanks for the responses guys.
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
Standard rule of thumb; castings are from metal poured into a mold and will have a fine (1/8" or so) line on the unmachined surfaces.
Forgings are billit material hammered into a die to shape material and will have a wider (1/2" or so) seam on unmachined surfaces.
You can see this on crank shafts, spindles and even on connecting rods of small engines.

I'd like to see that process..........................

G ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
"With the near-molten steel placed in a forging die, a hammer press slams the die with about 240,000 lbs. in not one but multiple steps"

I knew cold forging would be difficult for a crankshaft ;)


G
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top