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It's not even a matter of whether the rotating assembly incorporates a stroker crank or not.

The only crankshaft of which I am aware that is not a "drop-in" deal with the D9TE-AB block is 1968-1978 internal balance (2Y, 2YA, 2YAB, 2YABC, 4U, 4UA, and 4UAB) OEM crankshafts. In order to fit one of the internal balance cranks into a D9TE block, some main web clearancing needs to be exectuted to accomodate the internal balance crank's larger crankshaft counterweights.

For more info on block differences, click HERE.

Paul
I have a D9TE Block I plan to use a 4.14 stroke, should there be any problems, I hope not.
 

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I have a D9TE Block I plan to use a 4.14 stroke, should there be any problems, I hope not.

All of the common stroker cranks fit easily with steel rods.

4.140"
4.150"
4.300"
4.500"


The longer cylinder walls in the D9 block support the piston better at BDC on the 4.5" arm.








Scotty J. "AKA" The "Mad Porter"
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All of the common stroker cranks fit easily with steel rods.

4.140"
4.150"
4.300"
4.500"


The longer cylinder walls in the D9 block support the piston better at BDC on the 4.5" arm.








Scotty J. "AKA" The "Mad Porter"
"EMC 2006" 3rd place finisher
Ported BBF iron head specialist & Aluminum heads from all sources.
Custom ground cams
See our products in the Vendor for sale section
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ParklandAutoMachine.com
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Thank you for the reply, using 6.8 inch rods should be OK?? or even 7.1 inch rods? I am going to have the pistons made so I don't have to deal with decking the block beside I want 4032 pistons and I want to use AFR heads so I pretty much have to. And I just recently decided to go longer stroke than stock. It will be the cheapest way to gain power and efficiency. Some of those ways will be less piston weight, I was going to use CH pistons with a 1.778 now most likely 1.138, that most likely will save over 1000 grams when you add up all the pistons. and then the journals go from 2.5 to 2.2 ,maybe not much there but there is some. but the biggest gain is in the stroke itself and the cubic inch, plus the forged crank from a cast one.
 

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Thank you for the reply, using 6.8 inch rods should be OK?? or even 7.1 inch rods? I am going to have the pistons made so I don't have to deal with decking the block beside I want 4032 pistons and I want to use AFR heads so I pretty much have to. And I just recently decided to go longer stroke than stock. It will be the cheapest way to gain power and efficiency. Some of those ways will be less piston weight, I was going to use CH pistons with a 1.778 now most likely 1.138, that most likely will save over 1000 grams when you add up all the pistons. and then the journals go from 2.5 to 2.2 ,maybe not much there but there is some. but the biggest gain is in the stroke itself and the cubic inch, plus the forged crank from a cast one.
1.138 is a very short compression height which can have a negative impact on ring placement and sealing.
 

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Thank you for the reply, using 6.8 inch rods should be OK?? or even 7.1 inch rods? I am going to have the pistons made so I don't have to deal with decking the block beside I want 4032 pistons and I want to use AFR heads so I pretty much have to. And I just recently decided to go longer stroke than stock. It will be the cheapest way to gain power and efficiency. Some of those ways will be less piston weight, I was going to use CH pistons with a 1.778 now most likely 1.138, that most likely will save over 1000 grams when you add up all the pistons. and then the journals go from 2.5 to 2.2 ,maybe not much there but there is some. but the biggest gain is in the stroke itself and the cubic inch, plus the forged crank from a cast one.
You need to get on the phone and speak with someone with the technical expertise required to get you where you want to go.


Bye the bye....a 75cc Bullitt head on a 521 with a flat top is a tad over 13.0:1
 

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1.138 is a very short compression height which can have a negative impact on ring placement and sealing.
I have looked at a number of CH for other engines, do you have any thoughts with how much compression height is needed for this application.
 

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I have looked at a number of CH for other engines, do you have any thoughts with how much compression height is needed for this application.

Mark is an expert with pistons. Listen to him.

No need to reinvent the wheel here.

A shelf 4.3" / 6.8" / 1.350" CH OR 6.7" rod 4.5" arm is fine. Hell you can even go with a 6.8" with a 4.5" arm and a 1.250" CH though that is as tight as I'd go for the ring packs sake. Not sure I'd do that with a power adder.

A 4.150" arm with the typical 6.8" rod with a 1.425" CH is again fine. A 7" rod means a 1.225 CH...







Scotty J. "AKA" The "Mad Porter"
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Ported BBF iron head specialist & Aluminum heads from all sources.
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Mark is an expert with pistons. Listen to him.

No need to reinvent the wheel here.

A shelf 4.3" / 6.8" / 1.350" CH OR 6.7" rod 4.5" arm is fine. Hell you can even go with a 6.8" with a 4.5" arm and a 1.250" CH though that is as tight as I'd go for the ring packs sake. Not sure I'd do that with a power adder.

A 4.150" arm with the typical 6.8" rod with a 1.425" CH is again fine. A 7" rod means a 1.225 CH...







Scotty J. "AKA" The "Mad Porter"
"EMC 2006" 3rd place finisher
Ported BBF iron head specialist & Aluminum heads from all sources.
Custom ground cams
See our products in the Vendor for sale section
Customized crate engines
ParklandAutoMachine.com
R-H-P.biz
"Parkland Performance Auto Machine" Formerly RHP
(253)-988-6648
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I will call JE Pistons tomorrow and see what they say. if anything I could go with a 6.8 rod and a CH of 1.438 with a 4.14 crank, to be honest I am getting somewhat different information from other forums(some seem credible), including someone talking about going below 1 inch, I don't like that,,, a huge CH like on a 440 has some real negatives. Thanks for the answers.
 

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I will call JE Pistons tomorrow and see what they say. if anything I could go with a 6.8 rod and a CH of 1.438 with a 4.14 crank, to be honest I am getting somewhat different information from other forums(some seem credible), including someone talking about going below 1 inch, I don't like that,,, a huge CH like on a 440 has some real negatives. Thanks for the answers.
Why do you insist on making this harder than it is?
 

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Why do you insist on making this harder than it is?

He doesn't want to deck the damned block Mark !!!






Scotty J. "AKA" The "Mad Porter"
"EMC 2006" 3rd place finisher
Ported BBF iron head specialist & Aluminum heads from all sources.
Custom ground cams
See our products in the Vendor for sale section
Customized crate engines
ParklandAutoMachine.com
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"Parkland Performance Auto Machine" Formerly RHP
(253)-988-6648
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Why do you insist on making this harder than it is?
I have to have the pistons made anyway, there is no off the shelf for what I want to do, checking things out is only being prudent. I don't get your statement. Also AFR requires a certain piston for this particular head (most they don't but this one they do) there just isn't very much to choose from and yes this way I also don't have to deck the block. Plus I can choose 4032 vs. 2618 and yes I have read quite a bit about them pros and cons they are both great just different, and I want to use 4032 and I have already called JE and they said I could do that, this was a past call and CH was not discussed. I do appreciate the responses , I really do and thanks...............................................Update:: I called JE and they said that doing 1.138 pistons are not a problem but that they wouldn't likely last 200000 miles, He didn't put miles to it other than to say they won't last as long and that the sweet spot is at ,,, at least 1.250 to 1.3 , he did say that and my guess he would include 1.350, (sweet meaning you have enough piston with less weight than their tall CH counter parts) So I will most likely go to a piston with a 1.438 CH and slightly less rod (6.8)
 

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Have you checked the decks....and reevaluated your budget?

There are 3 different deck height blocks and then all the defugalties that used blocks exhibit.
 

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Have you checked the decks....and reevaluated your budget?

There are 3 different deck height blocks and then all the defugalties that used blocks exhibit.
You bring up a excellent point, and I have looked hard to see what mine would be ,, This I know that I got through a good deal a block that was made in 1991(even has the date on it) it is a D9TE. it is a fuel injected version complete with everything and looks like new, don't know why it was rejected but the place where I got assured me the block was good or they would refund the money, I mean this thing even has the original gray oil filter on it and is very clean (only dust) I have pictures, anyway everyone says it is 10.322,,, what I don't know and would be interested in finding out "are they all consistent in this 10.322" or do they need to be measured to be absolute? As new as this looks I doubt it needs boring but I will leave that up to the machine shop (builders). It has all the wiring everything(not that I will be using any of this but it's there) so if anyone needs any of this let me know. My budget will be able to handle all of this and I didn't get excited till I saw the flow numbers on the AFR Heads, wow, so now I am up to 494 cu inches. I want to build a powerful street motor that is also smooth and might get decent mileage with 308 gears and a 4L60 transmission , it will go in the vehicle that is in the picture, I have had since new in 1993, I am just the designer not the builder. I have done and am still doing extensive research. I might add I have been around engines my whole life and that's a while being I am 65.
 

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It is doubtful that all 4 corners of the block (1, 4, 5 and 8) are equidistant from the centerline of the main bearing bore unless the block has been decked off the main bearing bore in the past by a good machinist in a quality shop. You have to remember that these motors were machined at their birth in a mass production facility, where the mill operator could easily have missed a chip in the register that would have resulted in the block being cocked in the register and cut unevenly corner to corner. This would result in the heads being cocked off-parallel with absolutely no chance of all cylinders being the same static compression ratio or piston to deck measurement or of the intake manifold sitting squarely on the heads. The intake manifold not sitting squarely on the heads and not sealing up the bottom of the port can result in oil migration into the port and subsequent smoking at the exhaust outlet, a problem that is usually blamed on valve seals. My best advice is to cut the block decks to square and do it properly, setting the piston deck height the same on all 8 and eliminating considerable grief for yourself.
 
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