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The following info is from Charlie Evans, and is edited from his original post in that is only shows the pertain info on the actual build. Thank you Charlie for sharing this hard-earned knowledge. The original post can be found here:

http://www.460ford.com/viewtopic.php?t=14379

INDUCTION

Phillip Oakley, Oakley Motorsports 270-684-1069, provided the brand new external linkage Quick Fuel Technologies 1250 cfm carb. , with his CUSTOM calibration specs, and we never, ever touched the carb during the entire dyno session. It was "right" out of the box. The A/F ratio was anywhere from 12.45 to 12.71 and was consistent across the board.

FRPP H-429 Victor manifold, fully ported.

CYLINDER HEADS

The FRPP SCJ heads were fully ported, with a 2.250" intake valve. This is an average of all 8 intake ports and is on a 4.625" bore @ 28" H2O. Because the intake valve pierce point, on both the SCJ head and the P-51 head, is so far away from the cylinder wall, I agree with an earlier statement by Lem, that it probally doesn't make much, if any, difference what size bore these heads are flow tested on.

.100=71, .200=159, .300=259, .400=340, .500=394, .550"(Peak)=398, .600=375, .700=367, .750=366, .800=364 cfm.

Exhausts, 1.760" diameter valve, without a test pipe;
.100=58, .200=114, .300=161, .400=200, .500=226, .600=240, .700=248, .800=252 cfm.

The combustion chambers had the most even coloring and distribution of carbon, of any chambers I think I've seen. Likewise the tops of the pistons were very evenly coated with carbon. These P-51 heads and SCJ heads don't take much timing. Jon K. did his homework on the chamber design.

BLOCK

The engine is a DOVE-A block that sonic tested with real good thick cylinder walls. We installed Milodon four bolt main caps (splayed) on the center three. The block was bored .080" over.

ROTATING ASSEMBLY

Scat cast steel 9000 series 4.300" stroker crankshaft and Eagle 6.800" rods with the 2.200" rod journal.

The pistons were JE customs that Lem Evans worked out the specs on. Sometimes Lem and I experiment on ourselves before we go suggesting something for our customers. You all should appreciate that. When we mocked up the shortblock with this big cam, we realized that we still had plenty of valve relief. Since then, Lem has been specing a shallower valve relief, whether they be JE or Diamond pistons, (he's a dealer for both companies). The pistons weigh 590 grams and the total bob-weight is 2289 grams. For those of you comtemplating doing a similiar build, I'd like to warn you, that I don't think you can get there with the cheaper KB hyper piston or a shelf item budget piston. While these pistons are flat-tops, they aren't just any old flat-top. Lem did his homework with the ring package and placement. The compression ratio is around 13.8 to 1.

CAM

Comp Cams roller, that again was one of Lem's designs, with 284*/292* on a 110* LSA with .789" intake lift and .761" exhaust lift. That's a pretty good sized cam, and to take that much lift with any of the OEM style aftermarket heads, such as the TFS, B.T., P-51 or FRPP SCJ heads you're going to have to use a longer valve than the stock 5.265" intake. So I put a +.100" long valve in the intakes and used a REV 2" installed height valve spring. So the math works out 2.000 - .789 = 1.211 and coil bind is 1.150, so that leaves .061" away from coil bind, which is about perfect. The FRPP A-429 exhaust valve is a killer piece and is the best flowing exhaust valve for this application. At the time I did these heads about 3 years ago, the A-429 valve was the only one available with the proper tulip shaped backside and it was stock length only (5.060"). Since then, Jon Kaase has just gotten some new valves made, like these A-429 valves, but +.100" long. In order to get close to a 2.000" installed height on the exhaust, I used a set of +.050" Manley keepers with the lash cap recess and then cut the spring seat cup a little deeper and also sunk the valve about .010" on the chamber side. This works okay with the .761" lift on the exhaust side.

OIL PUMP

The new Jon Kaase Racing manufactured oil pump. As a side note, absolutely no modifications are needed with the Kaase pump. However, you can't use longer "bolts" with that oil pump. Due to the design, you have to use longer "studs", and let the pump drop on over the studs. Lem has some 150,000 psi grade 8 studs/nuts in stock for the pump.

EXHAUST SYSTEM

The Fab Shop (Tim Murphy), provided the 2.250" Fab Shop "down swept" style dragster headers. They are the best set of headers money can buy. We had a really, really good set of custom made 2.250" headers on the engine. Made especially for the car, by the chassis builder, that we started dyno testing with. However, at the end we switched over to The Fab Shop headers and showed a gain of +3.21 torque average, and a +3.9 Hp average across the board, at every increment, from 5700 through 7000 rpm. Also, The Fab Shop headers were 12 lbs. lighter. Something that Tim and I have recently learned is that the way to go with a stock exhaust port Ford head is to use my billet BB Ford to BB Chevy header adaptors. Like the old Jere Stahl style small block Chevy header adaptor or spacer plates, made fitting headers to a SBC easier and produced more power because you didn't have to pinch the header in for bolt clearance, my header adaptors allow us to do the same thing with big tube 2.250" headers on a traditional Ford exhaust port, where the bolts are close and will cause the primary pipe to be pinched down. So at this time, The Fab Shop is a dealer for the Evans Racing, Ford to Chevy header adaptors. Call them at (317)294-4323.

DYNO

RPM,,,,,TQ,,,,,HP

5000,,,700,,,666
5100,,,710,,,690
5200,,,717,,,709
5300,,,719,,,726
5400,,,718,,,738
5500,,,720,,,754
5600,,,719,,,766
5700,,,718,,,780
5800,,,719,,,794
5900,,,725,,,814
6000,,,726,,,829
6100,,,727,,,845
6200,,,722,,,853
6300,,,719,,,862
6400,,,714,,,870
6500,,,706,,,874
6600,,,699,,,879
6700,,,691,,,882
6800,,,680,,,880
6900,,,669,,,879
7000,,,657,,,875

The engine made 882 horsepower @ 6700 rpm and 727 lbs.ft. of torque @ 6100 rpm. That works out to 1.654 Hp/CID and 1.364 Tq/CID. So for a stock block, stock intake port location aftermarket head, we were well pleased.

When we were on the dyno, Lem specifically told me NOT to put very much timing in this thing because he didn't want to hurt the crank. So we ran it on 30* for the first few pulls and then put 32* in it for the last 3 or 4 pulls. Our tune-up is "safe" and not on the ragged edge.

As a side note, I am taking a guess here, but I suspect that the difference between the old style A-429 alum. CJ heads and the new style FRPP alum. SCJ heads, both fully ported, would be around 40 - 50 Hp.

SPECIAL NOTE

A special thanks goes out to all my friends and hell raisers who helped me build this engine, and then rebuild it and dyno it. Jet Boat Bob, Randy Malik, Lem Evans, Phillip Oakley, Mike Phillips, Bobby Shrewsberry, Billy Stearsman, David Wink, J.K. Smith, and Todd & Gail Lawyer. Kristina, this Bud's for you!

Hope you find this info informative,

Charlie Evans
 

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impressive numbers! I am thinking of building a motor like this one for truck pulling. I have a 514 now, 4.140 stroke. I would just need to get a 4.300 crank and go, well sort of. i wonder if the 4 bolt main kit could be done to a d1ve block? I think im living on the edge now with the 2 bolt block and stud girdle. Would you guys think with a 4 bolt upgrade a motor like this would be durable enough for truckpulling?
 

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With a full season on this combination now, we can say it was very dependable, very consistent. we ran [email protected] 146 in an 1800 lb. 4-link dragster 1.02 60 foot. I dont know of any 540 chevies around here that run as good as
this ford. kristina,gail and I would like to thank charlie evans for all his help this year, we had a blast.
 

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We got some chevy pipe rack boys around here in a peeing contest with one another about whos gonna be faster, they dont run near that fast with their Sunset racecraft high dollar junk as you gys do with that little Ford motor.

My brother made the comment we need a dragster to drop my 529 in and go make some believers out of them lol.
 

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I was wandering if you were refering to Tracy at Sunset Engines? I am definately a Ford Guy but they put out some of the fastest Chevy engines I race against.
 

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bruno said:
Charlie did you port those heads to flow that much at that lift ?? or is that just the design of the runners ??? why woundnt you want more flow at the highest lift ???
Bruno,

Yes, I ported and flowed the heads. It is a design characteristic of the FRPP SCJ heads that the intake ports flow that way. In other words it's pretty common out of all of them. Their flow curve is not linear like most heads, however it really doesn't hurt a thing in terms of the power that the engines make.

To further back up my statement, for years the Performance Professor Jim McFarland has been saying to seek quantitative flow gains at about 70% of your net intake valve lift. Part of the reason for that logic is that the piston's greatest acceleration/velocity on the intake stroke occurs around 75-78 degrees after top dead center (depending on stroke and rod length). This is before the valve has reached max lift, so basically he's telling us that mid-lift flow numbers are really important.
 

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In regards to port velocity,,,yes.

I was speaking about the piston's velocity being at it's max, when the rod is 90* to the crankpin or crank journal. This is normally occurs around 75 to 78 degrees after top dead center. It is dependent on the stroke length and the rod length. The formula for this is;

Tangent theta = Rod length divided by 1/2 stroke

Now then back to your heads. Let's say that your ported Edelbrock CJ heads, and Blakes ported TFS Street heads, flow the same flow numbers, (or nearly the same flow numbers), at all lift points from .100" through .800" lift. If my memory is correct, your heads have a volume of 330 cc intake port and Blakes have a volume of 310 cc intake port. The port length is the same, and the valve pierce points are the same.
Then it stand to reason that the smaller port, that flows the same cfm as the bigger port, must have a greater flow velocity in order to flow that same amount. I think that is what the guys are referring to, who have told you that.

Hope this helps,
 

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bruno said:
so i f we are talking about velocity thats why several members from the board here have said that my heads are very SLOW in reguards to velocity ....
Nick,

I think they were talking about your CAR being slow, not the heads :lol:

Charlie,

To answer your question, it was EVERYBODY saying Nick's car is slow :lol:


Bruce
 

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Nick,

If you still have my flow numbers add all mine together from .100 through .800 and divide by 8 and look at the average. Then do yours the same way and compare the two. Total average air flow is very important also, though some will argue this point.

What Charlie is telling you about the port size verses flow is why I think, the TFS Street heads seem to make more power than they they have a right to. And I think thats why I am having problems getting a converter to be tight enough, The converter guys are comparing my combo to known BBC of the same cubic inch and HP. They just don't have the torque that my engine does at the same RPM.

Maybe Charlie will add to this.


Blake
 
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