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OIL IS KILLING OUR CARS!!!!!
By: Keith Ansell, Foreign Parts Positively, Inc.

About a year ago I read about the reduction of zinc dithiophosphate (ZDDP) in the oils supplied with API approval that could affect sliding and high pressure (EP) friction in our cars. The reduction of these chemicals in supplied oil was based on the fact that zinc, manganese and/or phosphates reduce the effectiveness and eventually damage catalytic converters and introduce minute amounts of pollutants into our atmosphere.

A month or so ago I had a member of the Columbia Gorge MG Club bring a totally failed camshaft and lifters back to me that had only 900 miles on them!! I immediately contacted the camshaft regrinder and asked how this could happen. They were well aware of this problem as they were starting to have many failures of this type. In the past, the lack of a molybdenum disulfide camshaft assembly lubricant, at assembly, was about the only thing that could create this type of problem. My customer has assembled many engines and had lubricated the camshaft properly and followed correct break in procedures.

This got me on the phone to Delta Camshaft, one of our major suppliers. Then the bad news came out: It’s today’s “modern” API (American Petroleum Industry) approved oils that are killing our engines.

Next call: To another major camshaft supplier, both stock and performance (Crane). They now have an additive for whatever oil you are using during break-in so that the camshaft and lifters won’t fail in an unreasonably short period of time. They also suggest using a diesel rated oil on flat tappet engines.

Next call: To a racing oil manufacturer that we use for the race cars (Redline). Their response: “We are well aware of the problem and we still use the correct amounts of those additives in our products”. They continued to tell me they are not producing API approved oils so they don’t have to test and comply. Their oils were NOT the “new, improved and approved” ones that destroy flat tappet engines! “We just build the best lubricants possible”. Sounds stupid, doesn’t it, New-Approved but inferior products, but it seems to be true for our cars. To top this off: Our representative from a major supplier of performance and street engine parts (EPWI) stopped by to “warn us” of the problem of the NEW oils on flat tappet engines. This was a call that the representative was making only because of this problem to warn their engine builders! “The reduction of the zinc, manganese and phosphates are causing very early destruction of cams and followers”. They are recommending that, for now at least, there must be a proper oil additive put
in the first oil used on new engines, beyond the liberal use of molydisulfide assembly lube. They have been told that the first oil is the time the additives are needed but remain skeptical that the first change is all that is necessary. Their statement: Use diesel rated oils such as Delo or Rotella that are usually available at auto stores and gas stations.
This problem is BIG! American Engine Rebuilder's Association (AERA) Bulletin #TB2333 directly addresses this problem. I had a short discussion with their engineer and he agreed with all that I had been finding.

OIL IS KILLING OUR CARS!!!!!

Next phone call was to a retired engineer from Clevite, a major bearing and component manufacturer. First surprise was that he restored older British Motor bikes. The second surprise was that he was “VERY” aware of this problem because many of the old bikes had rectangular tappets that couldn’t rotate and are having a very large problem with the new oils. He has written an article for the British Bike community that verify all the “bad news” we have been finding. Comp Cams put out “#225 Tech Bulletin: Flat Tappet Camshafts”. They have both an assembly lube and an oil additive. The telling sentence in the bulletin was “While this additive was originally developed specifically for break-in benefits of its long term use. This special blend of additives promotes proper break-in and protects against premature cam and lifter failure by replacing some of the beneficial ingredients that the oil companies have been required to remove from the off the–shelf oil”.

Next question: Now what do we do?

From the camshaft re-grinders (DeltaCam) “Use oils rated for diesel use”, Delo (Standard Oil product) was named. About the same price as other quality petroleum based oils. They are not API formulated and have the zinc dithiophosphate we need in weights we are familiar with.

From the camshaft manufacturer (Crane): “use our additive” for at least the first 500 miles.

From General Motors (Chevrolet): add EOS, their oil fortifier, to your oil, it’s only about $12.00 for each oil change for an 8 ounce can (This problem seems to be something GM has known about for some time!).

From Redline Oil: Use our street formulated synthetics. They have what we need!

From our major oil distributor: Distributing Castro, Redline, Valvoline and Industrial oils: “After over a week of contacts we have verified that the major oil companies are aware of the problem”. “The representatives of the oil companies today are only aware of marketing programs and have no knowledge of formulation”. The only major oil companies they were aware of for doing anything to address this are Valvoline that is offering an “Off Road 20W-50” and Redline.

From Castrol: We are beginning to see a pattern emerging on older cars. It may be advantageous to use a non-approved lubricant, such as oils that are Diesel rated, 4 Cycle Motorcycle oils and other specified diesel oils.
Last question: So what are we at Foreign Parts Positively going to do? After much research we are switching to Redline Street rated oils and stocking the Castrol products that are diesel rated. Castrol, owned by British Petroleum, is now just a brand name. This is a difficult decision as we have been a dealer and great believer in all Castrol Products for over 40 years. We have been using Castrol Syntech oil in new engines for about 3 years so the cost difference in changing to Redline is minimal. The actual cost in operation is also less as the additive package in Redline makes a 1-year or up to 18,000 mile change recommended! Yes, it is a long change interval but with lowered sulfur levels and the elimination of lead and many other chemicals in the fuels there are less contaminants in our oil from the fuel, which is the major contributor to oil degradation. We will continue to offer the Castrol products but will now only stock the suggested diesel oils that they produce.

Part II.

Last month’s report on this subject is turning out to be just the tip of the iceberg!
Many publications have had this subject of zinc-dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDDP) covered in varying depths over the last few months. Some publications have even had conflicting stories when you compare one month’s article with their next month’s article! They are all ending up supporting our report.

I have had the good fortune to have the ear of quite a few leaders in the industry including some wonderful input from Castrol. We have been very reluctant to “dump” Castrol, as it has been such a great supporter of our cars and industry over the years. Castrol hasn’t really abandoned our cars, just shifted to a more mass marketing mode. Many Castrol products are not appropriate for our cars today, some still are.

Now for the latest report:

#1 Castrol GTX 20W-50 is still good for our cars after break-in! 10W-40, 10W-30 and other grades are NOT good. Absolute NOT GOOD for any oil (Any Brand) that is marked “Energy Conserving” in the API “Donut” on the bottle, these oils are so low with ZDDP or other additives that they will destroy our cams. Virtually all “Diesel” rated oils are acceptable.

#2 Castrol HD 30 is a very good oil for break-in of new motors. This oil has one of the largest concentrations of ZDDP and Moly to conserve our cams and tappets.

#3 Only an unusual Castrol Syntec 20W- 50 approaches the levels of protection we need when we look to the better synthetic lubricants. We are attempting to get this oil but will be using Redline 10W-40 or 10W-30 as these are lighter weights for better performance, flow volume, less drag and has the additive package we need.

#4 The trend today is to lighter weight oils to decrease drag, which increases mileage. Most of these seem to be the “Energy Conservation” oils that we cannot use.

#5 Redline oil and others are suggesting a 3,000-mile break-in for new engines! Proper seating of rings, with today’s lubricants is taking that long to properly seal. Shifting to synthetics before that time will just burn a lot of oil and not run as well as hoped.

#6 The “Energy Conservation“ trend was first lead by automakers to increase mileage numbers and secondly because the ZDDP and other chemicals degrade the catalytic converter after extended miles, increasing pollution. We don’t have catalytic converters and the mileage gains are not that significant for most of us. For you science buffs: ZDDP is a single polar molecule that is attracted to Iron based metals. The one polar end tends to “Stand” the molecule up on the metal surface that it is bonded to by heat and friction. This forms a sacrificial layer to protect the base metal of the cam and tappet from contacting each other.

Only at very high pressures on a flat tappet cam is this necessary because the oil is squeezed/wiped from the surface. This high pressure is also present on the gudgeon pin (wrist pin) in diesel engines, therefore the need for ZDDP in diesel engines. Second part of the equation is Molybdenum disulfide (Moly). The moly bonds to the zinc adding an additional, very slippery, sacrificial layer to the metal. I found out that too much of the moly will create problems; lack of this material reduces the effectiveness of the ZDDP. The percentage, by weight is from .01 to .02%, not much, but necessary. Latest conclusions: Running our older, broken in engines on Castrol 20W-50 GTX is ok. Break in a new engine for 3,000 miles on HD 30 Castrol. New engines (after break-in) and fairly low mileage engines will do best with the Redline 10W-40 or 10W-30 synthetic.
 

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Very interesting reading.
I know personally of problems with both Mobil 1 and Shell "long-life" oil.
Take a look at Midland Oil -> Old Quakerstate formulas.

Redline seems to be a safe bet. :)

Does anyone know how 76 compares? I have some faint memories of the 20W50 mineral oil beeing used in NASCAR. Same formula as the "of the shelf" stuff.
 

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It's getting to the point of using the not for public highway use "For Racing Purposes Only" oil for these high performance engines.
Most of them still have the good additive packages and sometimes even more.
I use TORCO "MPZ" for assembly, (KB supplies a small tube of this for their wrist pin assembly to their pistons), and the rest of that quart used for engine assembly goes into the engine for the first oil cycle. Can you guess what 'MPZ" stands for, lol...?
I have used this since the early 90's and told other people about it only to be sometimes ridiculed as not being necessary and just a waste of money.
OH WELL ...!
 

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I rarely have any flat-tappet camshaft break-in problems .. but, that's simply because I've been lucky; at least that is what I'm told.
 

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I am using Gulf Zinc + for the first 1500-2000 miles and after that I am going to move to Fully synthetic Kendal GT-1 Racing Green - it has some extra zinc (ZDDP). GM EOS is good additive for new engines with low zinc content oil.
 

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I use MPZ assembly lube for engine building as well and I've never had any problems, I think it's good stuff much less messy than oil.

I'm still wondering if additives that you dump into oil are the answer, I wonder if the new oils are able to carry the additives or if they tend to just settle out of the oil in a short period of time...
 

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That's good info. I know a couple machine shops here have gone to some assy. lube and a specially designed break-in oil from Joe Gibbs Racing. I know the oil is like $7.00/qt but since they've switched to that they haven't had any problems. They've been using 4qts. of JGR oil to do the break-ins. The Redline statements above are indeed very interesting, but who breaks a race engine in for 3000 miles? I usually break the cam in for about 30 min, change the oil, do some tuning and adjusting, and head to the track. Or the closest thing resembling such... What is considered by many on here to be sufficient break-in procedure for racing mills?



Doug... 8)
 

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What is considered by many on here to be sufficient break-in procedure for racing mills?


Break in the cam, load it against the converter to seat the rings, check for leaks, etc - then stand on it.
 

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My machine shop had me use he Rotella 15w40 with the GM additive. What would be the opinion of using the Castrol 20w-50 with the GM oil additive being as a regular mixture after the break in? I live in Florida and it seems that the 20w50 would be a good choice for my daily driver.
 

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Falcon67 said:
What is considered by many on here to be sufficient break-in procedure for racing mills?


Break in the cam, load it against the converter to seat the rings, check for leaks, etc - then stand on it.
My sediments exactly. :wink: :twisted:


Doug... 8)
 

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oils

Shell Rotella has several varieties available today. Too bad my favorite lube shop only carries the newest brand of Rotella. I have to pay an extra $30 for a new oil I don't need!
My question is; how do the new environmentally friendly diesel oils compare to last years diesel oils as per this thread?
The new catagories are CE, or CF, as compared to plain C, or CD rated oils.
The new diesel oils are designed for the new semi's which now have particulate (catalist) filters. That's the reason for ULSD (Ultra Low Sulpher Diesel) If you use ULSD, you have to run the new formulated oils, or you'll burn up the particulate filter. I do litterally mean burn up. The number of semi cab fires is really climbing fast!
We really need to identify which catagory (C, CE,CF etc) of semi oil we should be using, whether it's Delo, Rotella, Mobile 1 etc!
 

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wiped cam

What I'd like to know if its just the oil and guys are still wipping cams out using the rotella and the gm and other additives, thats telling me that its more than just the oil, I feel for you I wiped a lobe out on a comp cam. In my opinion I think its partly the oil, but I think its more the lifters also. What do you think.
 

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Crane Cams is certinally aknowledging the Zinc issue:

Crane Cam's Break In Procedure states:

"Due to the EPA’s mandate for zinc removal from most motor oils, proper flat tappet camshaft break-in procedure is more critical than ever before. This is true for both hydraulic and mechanical flat tappet camshafts. As a point of interest, the most critical time in the life of a flat tappet camshaft is the first 20 minutes of “break-in” during which the bottoms of the tappets “mate-in” with the cam lobes.

There are some oils with additive packages that are better for camshaft “break-in”. These include: Shell Rotella T oil; Chevron Delo 400; and Mobil DELVAC oil. These oils are listed as diesel oils, but work great for flat camshaft “break-in”. We also recommend the use of Crane
Cams # 99003-1 Break-in lube or GM “E.O.S.” (Engine Oil Supplement) Assembly Lubricant # 1052367. These should be poured over the lifters and camshaft prior to start up.

CAUTION: We do not recommend the use of synthetic oils for “break-in” because they are too slippery. This characteristic reduces the tendency of the lifter to rotate on the camshaft lobe and mate properly. Prior to installing the camshaft and lifters, it is recommended that the crankcase be drained and filled with new, clean oil. The oil filter should also be changed at this time. "


See the whole thing here:
http://www.cranecams.com/pdf/548e.pdf

In their Reasons & Causes for Cam Failures:

NOTE: Do not use synthetic oil during the break-in period. It is not recommended to use any type of oil restrictors to the lifter galley, or use windage trays, baffles,or plug any oil return holes in the valley. Oil has a two-fold purpose, not only to lubricate, but to draw the heat away from whatever it comes in contact with. The cam needs oil splash from the crankcase, and oil run-back from the top of the engine to help draw the heat away. Without this oil flow, all the heat generated at the cam is transferred to the lifter, which can contribute to it's early demise.

NOTE: Increased spring pressure from a spring change and/or increased valve lift can hinder lifter rotation during cam break-in. We have found that decreasing spring pressure during the break-in period will be a great help. This can be accomplished by using a shorter ratio rocker arm to lower the valve lift; and/ or removing the inner spring, during the cam break-in time, if dual springs are being used.
 

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Thanks for posting the Crane Cams information. The link mentioned that the oils recommended are diesel oils. Here's where I think I have a couple of cents of caution.

If I remember correctly, from the number of articles I have read about this diminishing zinc from oils, diesel was listed as an alternative, but there was a warning that this year, 2007, diesel fuels will also be undergoing the same restrictions on zinc levels, because tractor trailer trucks are apparently being forced into using or using more catalytic converters. The zinc in oil does something to them, so this year, along with the converters, the zinc level is also being addressed.

I'll have to dig through my magazines or some of the things I downloaded from the web, but I am pretty sure on this. I wanted to mention this in case someone was thinking of grabbing some diesel oil for break-ins. I remember thinking that I should stock up on some diesel oils before the first of this year.

Guess what I forgot to do!
 

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Rotella

Ive been running Rotella synthetic - does it still have zinc? I sure as hell hope so!!
 

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mguy said:
there was a warning that this year, 2007, diesel fuels will also be undergoing the same restrictions on zinc levels
I read something in a Shell Rotella FAQ that said that zinc levels were being reduced "some".

I have not been able to find any specs that really tell how much is left in Rotella, or how that compares to other motor oils.
 

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Yeah, jrocco, I think I remember reading that it will be a slight reduction, and not at the level for regular oil.

:shock: Yet.

(Insert dramatic "dun-dun dunnnnnnn!" here)
 
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