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New EDL headed 466, 9.6 comp.,Comp.EX.278H cam 234 deg. int. 244 deg. ex. Meziere water pump, Alum. rad.with two 7/8" pass,18" spall fan with shroud, EMP Stewart hi flow 160 deg. thermo. This thing wants to run at about 200 deg. and higher in 80 deg. weather...Would like to get it down to 180-190.One friend says 50/50 coolant is better and another friend says water and " water weter " works best. Just running straight water now. Any feedback?
 

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Straight water will always transfer heat better than any coolant, but if you're gonna run it, add a DAMN GOOD CORROSION INHIBITOR TO IT! If not, you're gonna eat away the cooling passages in your block, and everywhere else the water flows.
 

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STRAIGHT WATER IS BEST,with an bottle of adative to prevent rust.

see water adsorbs more heat then aintifrezz,thus taking away more service heat from the parts it come in contact with while passing thru




-rich
 

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I'd question water being better. In WW2 when they came out with glycol, they could make the radiators on the airplanes about 30% smaller and still have them cool.
 

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So let me ask this question then, how do you prep the engine for cold storage? Just disconnect the lower radiator hose and let all the water run out? I'd be worried about cracking the block, you know?
 

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For cold conditions, drain all the water out of the radiator and engine, and fill it up with 100% anti-freeze. Start engine and let it circulate.

Reverese the process in the warm conditions.
 

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So let me ask this question then, how do you prep the engine for cold storage? Just disconnect the lower radiator hose and let all the water run out? I'd be worried about cracking the block, you know?

of course not, first i install petccocks on all the engines i do,for 2 reasons we always drain the water a few times a year,
2nd, so when they go into storage for winter we either drain the rad,and both sides of block let them sit dry,which is what we do for most, or some of the guys put antifrezz in for the winter,then drain it in the summer
 

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100% antifreeze will freeze it need some water to keep it from freezing if you don't beleave me take some 100% antifreeze and put 4 oz. in a coke bottle with some pur anitfreeze and put it in the freezer.then take another with 4oz anti. and a 1 oz of water mix it up and put it in the freezer and see with one freeze.I am talking about 100% pur antifreeze not the 50/50 stuff as it is already mixed with water.

I run antifreeze in everything except my ranger but it will get antifreeze in the winter.

Jim
 

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100% antifreeze will freeze it need some water to keep it from freezing if you don't beleave me take some 100% antifreeze and put 4 oz. in a coke bottle with some pur anitfreeze and put it in the freezer.then take another with 4oz anti. and a 1 oz of water mix it up and put it in the freezer and see with one freeze.I am talking about 100% pur antifreeze not the 50/50 stuff as it is already mixed with water.

I run antifreeze in everything except my ranger but it will get antifreeze in the winter.

Jim
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where do people get this info? noone sells 100 percent pure ant in stores, in all our semis, cars etc we ran straight from the jug, it tested -45 or -50 or better, we run non mixed,as some would call 100 percent, take a glass put some in out of the jug set it out side not the mixed stuff, or better yet check it with the tool in the jug, i hope noone uses premixed from like walmart, because if then you mix it it will frezz,,, @about -20 / -25

we run it straight, you need to start buyin better brand stuff, it doesnt freeze

there is just too much bad info out there

there's also a meth i hear about it will have to be warm to check it
 

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In Canada we get the 100% stuff anywhere that sells anti freeze. You mix it about 40% water and it's good for 40 below. If you use it straight it'll gel up in the rad and won't circulate at those temps. That's just the way it is. We run it all year round with no problems.
 

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ya cant get that here in parts stores by us
 

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I've had great results with roughly 80% water, 20% antifreeze, and a bottle of Water Wetter.

with 50/50 and no Water Wetter, about 20 degrees hotter at least
 

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Water runs cooler but it has absolutely nothing to do with heat transfer. Its boiling points. Tap water is considerred "hard" water. Distilled water is considerred "soft" water. Soft water is used when aluminum parts are concerned due ONLY to basically "sandblasting" the aluminum.
Now as water sits in an engine, different properties are concerned at that mostly being electrolysis. I am not running the Blue Thunders I have in my boat due only to the fact that primarily I run in brackish water. Corrosion due to oxides in not the issue rather the harder water waring away the aluminum heads.
Antifreeze is used PRIMARILY for what its name states: anti freeze. There are many chemicals on the market that claim cooler running temps. All work from a pressure standpoint. Think about freon. Most people dont realize that this is in actuality a HOT gas. It gets cold when its forced under pressure through a very small hole.

Just to clear up a few water basics.

Forgot to mention, coolant does not expand and contract like water does at the temps motors run at. Therefore a closed loop cooling system would not work with pure antifreeze. I had a customer try this in a `73 Torino. Some freeze plugs blew out.
 

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I'd question water being better. In WW2 when they came out with glycol, they could make the radiators on the airplanes about 30% smaller and still have them cool.
The majority of airplanes flown in WWII were air-cooled radial engines. No antifreeze needed. The 30% Glycol has to be introduced because of the higher altitudes that the planes flew at. 59* @ sea level is 1.9* @ 16,000. They flew much higher than that. At altitude they could have used a heater core from a GEO Metro to keep it cool. Allisons and Merlin motors are the only engines that come to mind on the Ally side that required a radiator. I could be wrong, I'm getting old now and my memory isn't the greatest.

On subject, I talked to a radiator manufacturer in CA, and he told me to use 100% distilled water and 1 bottle of water wetter for the best cooling. Straight water actually forms small bubbles on the surface of hot engine parts, thus creating a vapor barrier impeding the transfer of heat. The water wetter changes the viscosity of the water, eliminating the the bubbles and allowing more efficient transfer of heat. Boil a pot of water and watch where the bubbles cling to before it gets to a rapid boil. Like I said this came from a manufacturer, not just a dealer and he has no money in Redline products.
 

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The majority of airplanes flown in WWII were air-cooled radial engines. No antifreeze needed. The 30% Glycol has to be introduced because of the higher altitudes that the planes flew at. 59* @ sea level is 1.9* @ 16,000. They flew much higher than that. At altitude they could have used a heater core from a GEO Metro to keep it cool. Allisons and Merlin motors are the only engines that come to mind on the Ally side that required a radiator. I could be wrong, I'm getting old now and my memory isn't the greatest.

On subject, I talked to a radiator manufacturer in CA, and he told me to use 100% distilled water and 1 bottle of water wetter for the best cooling. Straight water actually forms small bubbles on the surface of hot engine parts, thus creating a vapor barrier impeding the transfer of heat. The water wetter changes the viscosity of the water, eliminating the the bubbles and allowing more efficient transfer of heat. Boil a pot of water and watch where the bubbles cling to before it gets to a rapid boil. Like I said this came from a manufacturer, not just a dealer and he has no money in Redline products.



x2
 

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"..most WWII planes were air cooled"...Hmm. All those Spitfires, Hurricanes, Mustangs, Lightnings, Typhoons, Tempests, Lancasters, Halifaxes,Mosquitoes, etc., not to mention thousands of Messerschmitts and Heinkels will be happy to hear that they were in the minority. Merlins, Griffons, Napier Sabres, Allisons Daimlers and Junkers Jumo's used millions of gallons of glycol. And all those train busters and ground attack missions were flown at ground level, wide open throttle. Mustangs did that even into Korea.
Actually, all those engines are air cooled, they just use a liquid transfer medium. Haha.
 
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